Page 1 of 6 12345 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 30 of 157
  1. #1
    5. timvp's Avatar
    My Team
    San Antonio Spurs
    Post Count
    53,719
    Going into the much-ballyhooed 2012 Western Conference Finals, the Spurs are considered the favorites. While San Antonio is undoubtedly the hotter team over the last couple months, do they deserve to be the favorites over the Thunder? Yes, I believe they do.

    Here are the top eight reasons why I believe:

    8. Uncle Mo
    While it can be argued how much momentum matters in the playoffs (if it matters at all), my opinion is simple: Momentum can't hurt. And that's especially true with how well the Spurs have been playing lately. An 18-game winning streak and winning 29 of their previous 31 games can't -- and shouldn't -- be ignored.

    During that 29-2 run, the Spurs have outscored their opponents by 13.2 points per game. Over the same stretch, the Thunder are 21-10 with an average margin of a 6.6 points -- or exactly half of San Antonio's margin.

    Many pundits may point to Oklahoma City's experience and success in close games, especially in the first two rounds of the playoffs. However, there's one thing better than being a team that is great in close games: Being a team that routinely blows out the competition. Winning close games always requires a certain amount of luck, while there is nothing lucky about smashing the opposition.

    7. OKC's Lineup Quandary
    The Thunder have a set rotation that they've utilized over most of the last two seasons. That rotation features Thabo Sefolosha in the starting lineup and James Harden coming off the bench -- even though Harden is clearly the better player. This alignment usually works well for Oklahoma City because it allows Sefolosha, by far the team's best perimeter defender, to lockup the other team's best offensive swingman at the outset.

    But there's one glaring problem with that strategy in this series: San Antonio's best swingman, Manu Ginobili, comes off the bench. To begin games, what will Sefolosha's purpose be on defense? He'd be overkill against Danny Green or Kawhi Leonard. Perhaps the Thunder will put him on Parker ... but that cross matchup would probably just make the Spurs even deadlier in transition.

    Green and Leonard, like Sefolosha, are primarily defensive players. However, they are both good enough offensively to be assets on that end on most nights. Sefolosha, on the other hand, is a much more offensively-challenged player than either Green or Leonard, to put it nicely. Thus, if Sefolosha isn't serving a purpose on defense, it'll be difficult for the Thunder to justify starting him.

    A solution for OKC could be to move Sefolosha to the bench. And while that may very well happen, the alteration of a well-oiled rotation probably won't be seamless for the young squad.

    6. Threes as Weaponry
    No matter how you slice it, the Spurs are superior from beyond the three-point line. While the Thunder's shooting from downtown should be classified as above average, the Spurs are elite. During these playoffs, the disparity between the two teams has widened. In the Mavericks and Lakers, the Thunder went against two teams who are weak at defending against three-pointers, yet OKC is shooting less threes and shooting a lower percentage than in the regular season. Conversely, the Spurs are sizzling from deep in the playoffs -- both in terms of makes and percentage.

    Three-point shooting against the Thunder is vital for one reason: OKC is far and away the best shotblocking team in the NBA. They thrive at swarming to the paint from the weakside; when not rejecting attempts, they are oftentimes altering the desired trajectory. In addition to Serge Ibaka, the league's leading shotblocker, Nazr Mohammed, Kendrick Perkins and Kevin Durant can also block shots at relatively high rates.

    To combat that shotblocking, the Spurs will space the court with shooters. That means San Antonio will spend as much time as possible with four three-point marksmen simultaneously on the court. In theory, such an arrangement should make Ibaka (and the other shotblockers) think twice about leaving his man to hunt blocks.

    In general, everything suggests the Spurs will have the advantage when it comes three-point shooting in the series. The Spurs are above average at limiting open three-point looks on defense. The Thunder, on the other hand, are in the middle of the pack when it comes to defending the three-point line.

    5. The Turnover Battle
    Typically, turnovers haven't really been an issue in the playoffs for the Spurs in the Tim Duncan Era. San Antonio doesn't force many turnovers but they also don't turn it over much, so it usually evens out over the course of a series. However, in the 2012 WCF, turnovers will be in focus.

    During the regular season, the Thunder turned it over more than any team in the NBA. But against the Lakers in the second round, OKC's turnovers were way, way down. They went from a regular season average of 16.3 turnovers per game to only 9.0 per game against L.A. -- a microscopic amount.

    However, that feat by the Thunder should come with a bolded footnote. It's not sufficient to say the Lakers were poor at forcing turnovers. In fact, since turnovers became an official statistic in the NBA, no team has ever forced turnovers at a lower rate than the 2011-12 Lakers.

    Although the Spurs were the sixth worst team in the NBA at forcing turnovers this season, they were able to force in excess of 20% more turnovers than the Lakers. If San Antonio could force Oklahoma City to turn the ball over at their regular season rate, that could be a series-changing accomplishment.

    On the other end, the Spurs were the third least turnover-prone in the NBA this season. Add in the fact that the Thunder forced turnovers at the eighth lowest rate in the league and, on paper at least, the Spurs don't appear destined to turn the ball over much in this series.

    4. Run, I Dare You
    In the lead up to this series, we'll hear a lot about how the Thunder want to take advantage of their young legs and get out and push the tempo. The truth, however, is the Thunder would be foolish to think that strategy would work against the Spurs. San Antonio is the most efficient transition team in the NBA and they become virtually unbeatable in fast paced games.

    Consider this: In games in which there have been at least 94 possessions, the Spurs have won 21 straight games. Over the same time frame, the Thunder are 11-7 at games played at that pace. In other words, if the Thunder think they can run the Spurs out of the building, they'll be in for a rude awakening.

    If the pace becomes elevated, the key for the Spurs will be to avoid giving up easy transition buckets. The Thunder have the athletes to finish two-on-one and three-on-two fast breaks nearly every time. But if the Spurs can get back on defense and contest shots, San Antonio is more than happy to allow OKC to run until they get a bluish tint.

    3. Lineup Versatility
    Though Oklahoma City's starting lineup features a tradition quintet, one of their team's deadliest qualities is their versatility. They are able to switch from traditional to big to small and back again without skipping a beat.

    The man most responsible for their lineup versatility is Kevin Durant. He's about an inch and a half taller than his listed height of 6-foot-9 and has an enormous wingspan of nearly 7-foot-5. He's extremely mobile and has added enough strength to thrive at shooting guard, small forward and power forward.

    The good news for the Spurs is their lineups are nearly as versatile, largely due to the emergence of Kawhi Leonard and Danny Green. Green can defend three positions, while Leonard can actually guard four positions. Both players are also really good rebounders for their size who aren't afraid to bang in the painted area. As a result, there's a good chance that OKC's lineup versatility can be mostly neutralized by San Antonio's young duo.

    If Durant is at power forward, the Spurs can just move Leonard to power forward. As long as Green is in the game along with Manu Ginobili or Stephen Jackson for added tenacity and toughness, the Spurs should be able to go right back at the Thunder with a quality small ball lineup of their own.

    If the Thunder try to go big, the Spurs have a number of big lineup options including the usage of Tim Duncan and Tiago Splitter together, or playing Leonard at shooting guard. Sometimes Pop gets criticized for mixing and matching so much during the regular season, but this is an example of how his experiments could pay notable dividends.

    2. Where No Star Point Guard Has Gone Before
    This era of Thunder has played a total of six series in the playoffs. Here are the starting point guards they've gone against: Jason Kidd twice, Ramon Sessions, Derek Fisher, Mike Conley and Ty Lawson. While solid point guards, there is no star on that list or anyone close to the level of Tony Parker. In this upcoming series, going against a point guard of Parker's quality is going to be a new experience for Oklahoma City in the postseason.

    Coming out of UCLA, Russell Westbrook had the reputation of a defensive stopper. And while he has far surpassed his offensive expectations, his defense thus far in his career can best be described as inconsistent. Opponents had a PER of 16.1 against him this season. While not an astronomically high number, it's higher than any of the other perimeter players on the Thunder.

    In the last two seasons, Parker and Westbrook have gone at each other for a total of 178 minutes. Per 40 minutes against Westbrook, Parker averaged 26.3 points and 7.4 assists on 50.6% shooting from the field. On the other side, per 40 minutes against Parker, Westbrook averaged 21.9 points and 7.2 assists on 39.9% shooting.

    All that said, Westbrook is playing great basketball right now. He seems to be excelling on both sides of the court and he has been one of the best players in the NBA so far in the 2012 playoffs. He very well may be up to the challenge of slowing Parker. But, the point is, nobody knows for sure. At the very least, I assume it will be a little bit of an adjustment for Westbrook in that he'll be forced to play both ends of the court. Against the Mavs and Lakers, that was rarely, if ever, the case.

    1. Defense
    If you've been locked away in a dungeon since 2007, you wouldn't be surprised that defense is the leading reason why the Spurs should be considered the favorite in a series. However, defense looked like anything but a strength to begin this season. As the season progressed, San Antonio's defense went from poor to pretty bad to average to where it is now. Where is that, exactly? I'd say somewhere north of Above Average Avenue and south of Best Boulevard.

    Over the last third of the regular season, the Spurs were in the top five or six in the NBA in terms of defensive efficiency. During the playoffs, the defensive stats have gotten even better: San Antonio has allowed only 97 points per 100 possessions. To put that in perspective, that's 6.3 points better than their defensive efficiency in the regular season. In fact, you can make a good case that the Spurs have played the best defense of any team in the playoffs.

    (To make that case, I will simply take each playoff team's actual defensive efficiency thus far in the postseason and compare it to their expected defensive efficiency -- a number equal to the average offensive efficiency of their playoff opponents during the regular season.)

    Best Defenses as Percentage Better than Expectation
    Spurs +9.9%
    Celtics +8.9%
    Heat +8.8%
    Pacers +6.3%
    Sixers +4.6%
    Thunder +1.4%

    Yes, the Jazz were green. Yes, the Clippers were hobbled. But so far, the San Antonio defense has been sturdy in the postseason. The Thunder, on the other hand, statistically have the worst defense of any team still alive in the playoffs. Yes, they had a relatively difficult road in the first two rounds but it's undeniable that the Thunder have been winning mostly with their offense.

    Against OKC, the Spurs will have their hands full defensively. Durant, Westbrook and Harden are all amazing offensive players. If you are San Antonio, four aspects give you hope:

    A) Outside of Durant, Westbrook and Harden, the only other halfway decent offensive threat is Ibaka. Everyone else is well below average offensively. OKC has some good spot-up shooters and a couple players that can score around the rim if ignored -- but it's basically their Big 3 with a sprinkling of Ibaka.

    B) If you need a coach to figure out a scheme to stop a high-powered offense, there's probably nobody on the planet you'd want before Gregg Popovich. This is where the coaching advantage should work in San Antonio's favor. Pop has figured out genius ways to stop high-powered offenses before; let us hope he can do it again.

    C) The Spurs might be able to limit their possessions. I mentioned turnovers above but rebounding is another area where the Thunder shouldn't cause too many problems. Oklahoma City is worse than the Clippers and Jazz at rebounding -- both on the offensive end and defensive end. When it comes to defensive rebounding, OKC is actually quite poor. If the Spurs can keep the Thunder off the offensive glass and gobble up a few more offensive boards of their own, the result could help tip the scale in San Antonio's favor -- especially when you add in the potential added possessions from the turnover differential.

    D) The Big 3 of the Spurs has been together for a thousand years and their chemistry is impeccable. Meanwhile, the chemistry of the Thunder's Big 3 appears to be a work in progress. Grumblings can often be heard about Westbrook not giving the ball to Durant enough. Now with Harden needing more and more touches as he blossoms into a star, does OKC really know their own pecking order? Personally, it looks like they may need more time to figure it out. Don't get me wrong, they are already great offensively ... but I'm not 100% sure they have championship-caliber chemistry right this second. What will happen if the Spurs are having success and the chips are down? The Spurs can hope that the Thunder need another full season to reach their peak effectiveness.


    Overall, I'm optimistic of San Antonio's chances. It's not going to be easy regardless of what Spurs fans who are blinded by the glare of the 18-game winning streak will tell you. It will require a number of players being at the top of their game. I haven't yet decided on my final prediction but I really do believe the Spurs can do this.

    Believe.










    .
    Last edited by timvp; 05-24-2012 at 11:14 AM.

  2. #2
    uups stups! Cant_Be_Faded's Avatar
    My Team
    San Antonio Spurs
    Post Count
    28,114
    Believe.



    (trying, anyways)
    _____________________________

    Code:
    Mookie2001:
    they say ramonce taylor makes reggie bush look like rasho

    I wanna know where tha gold at? Stooooooops!
    The Greatest Moment In The History Of The World:
    http://www.theunticket.com/deion-san...ng-is-ringing/
    RIP whottt

  3. #3
    Redemption TE's Avatar
    My Team
    San Antonio Spurs
    Post Count
    12,944
    Nice write up.

  4. #4
    Bonner/Blair can't do dat capek's Avatar
    My Team
    San Antonio Spurs
    Post Count
    3,521
    Probably my favorite of your pre-series write ups so far.


    3. Lineup Versatility
    Though Oklahoma City's starting lineup features a tradition quintet, one of their team's deadliest qualities is their versatility. They are able to switch from traditional to big to small and back again without skipping a beat.

    The man most responsible for their lineup versatility is Kevin Durant. He's about an inch and a half taller than his listed height of 6-foot-9 and has an enormous wingspan of nearly 7-foot-5. He's extremely mobile and has added enough strength to thrive at shooting guard, small forward and power forward.

    The good news for the Spurs is their lineups are nearly as versatile, largely due to the emergence of Kawhi Leonard and Danny Green. Green can defend three positions, while Leonard can actually guard four positions. Both players are also really good rebounders for their size who aren't afraid to bang in the painted area. As a result, there's a good chance that OKC's lineup versatility can be mostly neutralized by San Antonio's young duo.

    If Durant is at power forward, the Spurs can just move Leonard to power forward. As long as Green is in the game along with Manu Ginobili or Stephen Jackson for added tenacity and toughness, the Spurs should be able to go right back at the Thunder with a quality small ball lineup of their own.

    If the Thunder try to go big, the Spurs have a number of big lineup options including the usage of Tim Duncan and Tiago Splitter together, or playing Leonard at shooting guard. Sometimes Pop gets criticized for mixing and matching so much during the regular season, but this is an example of how his experiments could pay notable dividends.
    About OKC's small lineup. Given Pop's penchant for matching small with small, I'm thinking this will probably stay a hypothetical. But here's how I'd really like to see him counter a lineup of Westbrook, Harden, Thabo, Durant at the four, and Ibaka/Perkins:

    Tony, Manu/Green, Kawhi/SJax, Diaw/Bonner, and Timmy/Splitter, with Kawhi/SJax guarding Durant, and Diaw/Bonner on Thabo (preferred lineup in bold).

    Diaw/Bonner could stay on Thabo, as he camps out at the three point line, and keep an eye out for his cuts to be basket, while also cheating a bit to help on drives and add some size for rebounding. On offense, Diaw could really exploit the Thunder for easy hoops in the paint, and when Bonner is in, there would be tons of space for Tony and Manu to drive to the bucket, with the Thunder only having one big in the game.

    I think this could be such a successful response to this particular small lineup the Thunder like to run, that it might force Brooks to go away from it and leave two bigs in the game, which again plays into our hand considering that the Thunder get no offense from the post.

    I'm not sure if we'll see Pop try this adjustment, or if it'll even be needed, but I think it has a good chance of being successful if he gives it a run.
    _____________________________

  5. #5
    Erryday I'm Hustlin' Robz4000's Avatar
    My Team
    San Antonio Spurs
    Post Count
    9,330
    Been waiting for this thread. Good read!
    _____________________________
    aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA
    WHERE DA HOOD WHERE DA HOOD WHERE DA HOOD @
    HAD THAT ***** IN THE CUT WHERE THE WOOD @
    ALL DEM ****** ACTIN UP WHERE THE WOLVES @
    YOU BETTA BUST THAT IF YOU GONNA PULL TH@


    http://spurstalk.com/forums/image.php?type=sigpic&userid=26403&dateline=130696  0925

  6. #6
    Veteran Libri's Avatar
    My Team
    San Antonio Spurs
    Post Count
    11,193
    I think the defense and freethrow shooting will be critical for the Spurs success. OKC is the best freethrow shooting team in the league, so Pop will not have the hack-a-somebody as a recourse to kill the opposing team's momentum. The Spurs will have to rely on their defense.

    Furthermore, OKC is averaging 24+ freethrow attempts. A big chunk of the Thunder's points, 20+, comes from the freethrow line. The Spurs will have the difficult task of playing aggressive defense but without committing too many fouls.

    The good news is that Spurs, in the playoffs, are not far behind with 22+ attempts and are near the bottom in committing fouls. The Thunder are close to the top in fouls committed per game. Therefore, winning could come down to freethrow shooting. I believe the Spurs are up to the challenge.

  7. #7
    5. timvp's Avatar
    My Team
    San Antonio Spurs
    Post Count
    53,719
    I think the defense and freethrow shooting will be critical for the Spurs success. OKC is the best freethrow shooting team in the league, so Pop will not have the hack-a-somebody as a recourse to kill the opposing team's momentum. The Spurs will have to rely on their defense.

    Furthermore, OKC is averaging 24+ freethrow attempts. A big chunk of the Thunder's points, 20+, comes from the freethrow line. The Spurs will have the difficult task of playing aggressive defense but without committing too many fouls.

    The good news is that Spurs, in the playoffs, are not far behind with 22+ attempts and are near the bottom in committing fouls. The Thunder are close to the top in fouls committed per game. Therefore, winning could come down to freethrow shooting. I believe the Spurs are up to the challenge.
    My original list was nine long with free throws included. But it became too complicated the more I looked at it so I decided to split it out into another post.

    I wasn't quite confident enough regarding free throws for it to make this list, tbh.

  8. #8
    5. timvp's Avatar
    My Team
    San Antonio Spurs
    Post Count
    53,719
    capek, that's a pretty damn good idea. Sefolosha is a good shooter but he shoots so infrequently that you can probably hide a big on him if need be. The Spurs did something similar with QRich back in 2005 ... and QRich back then was much more dangerous than Sefolosha is today.

  9. #9
    Believe. Floyd Pacquiao's Avatar
    My Team
    San Antonio Spurs
    Post Count
    3,846
    good read....thanks timvp
    _____________________________

  10. #10
    Veteran Libri's Avatar
    My Team
    San Antonio Spurs
    Post Count
    11,193
    My original list was nine long with free throws included. But it became too complicated the more I looked at it so I decided to split it out into another post.

    I wasn't quite confident enough regarding free throws for it to make this list, tbh.
    Looking forward to reading about it.

  11. #11
    Bonner/Blair can't do dat capek's Avatar
    My Team
    San Antonio Spurs
    Post Count
    3,521
    capek, that's a pretty damn good idea. Sefolosha is a good shooter but he shoots so infrequently that you can probably hide a big on him if need be. The Spurs did something similar with QRich back in 2005 ... and QRich back then was much more dangerous than Sefolosha is today.
    Ya, I mean I can't think of any reasons why it wouldn't not only work, but be pretty effective. All the times I watched the Thunder play this year (and it wasn't just against the Spurs or during the playoffs), I don't remember ever seeing Thabo take his defender off the dribble, or even attempt it. It's all spot up threes and cuts to the basket from him. I think both Diaw and Bonner are disciplined enough on defense that they wouldn't get exploited by that too often.

    And like the Jazz series this year seemed to exorcise some of your demons from past losses to the Jazz, for me this would exorcise the demon of Pop changing his lineup to go small vs small against Dallas in '06. That still bugs me for some reason.

  12. #12
    Veteran roycrikside's Avatar
    My Team
    San Antonio Spurs
    Post Count
    1,525
    capek, that's a pretty damn good idea. Sefolosha is a good shooter but he shoots so infrequently that you can probably hide a big on him if need be. The Spurs did something similar with QRich back in 2005 ... and QRich back then was much more dangerous than Sefolosha is today.
    I don't see the benefit of it, tbh. The rebounding edge of Diaw over Leonard at the 4 isn't that substantial and he's not aggressive enough to take advantage of Durant in the post. Even though he's got the weight, Durant has a massive advantage in wingspan to counter that, and I think the refs will protect him down there. And it's not like Bonner will back down Durant.

    Unless Diaw buries Durant in the post every trip, what do we gain from that?

    Also, not sure how much Harden and Sefolosha even play together. I think Fisher is more of their smallball guy.

  13. #13
    🏆🏆🏆🏆🏆 ElNono's Avatar
    My Team
    San Antonio Spurs
    Post Count
    89,003
    Good read, thanks!
    _____________________________

  14. #14
    Veteran roycrikside's Avatar
    My Team
    San Antonio Spurs
    Post Count
    1,525
    Personally, I think we'd want the Thunder to play small. The more the better. Duncan posting up Ibaka is a big-time advantage for us. He's not nearly stocky enough to guard Tim. We'd have post-ups, maybe even draw some double teams, and we could run all kinds of pick and rolls with Tony and Manu, with Green and Leonard on the corners.

    It'd be a very open, high-scoring set, but we'd have the shooting advantage and we could hide either Parker or Manu on Fisher, where as the Thunder couldn't hide him on anyone, and Westbrook, Harden and Durant would have to be engaged on every defensive possession. Our two veteran guards could take turns having a blow on defense.

    I'm a lot more worried about the Thunder when they play with Perkins and Ibaka together, tbh.

  15. #15
    Redemption TE's Avatar
    My Team
    San Antonio Spurs
    Post Count
    12,944
    timvp, realistically and statistically speaking, how much success do you think Leonard will have going up against Durant?

    It's an intriguing match-up to say the least.

  16. #16
    Hedo Layup Drill ShoogarBear's Avatar
    My Team
    San Antonio Spurs
    Post Count
    39,520
    5. The Turnover Battle
    Ultimately, this is what did in the Lakers. Westbrook averaged less than one turnover per game. Even with LA's late-game meltdowns, if OKC had turned the ball over at their usual rate, then the Lakers are up 3-2 and still playing that series.

    It's very possible that Durant and Westbrook will both have white-hot shooting for four games in a seven game series, in which case there's not a whole lot you can do. But the statistical chance of them being that careful with the ball again has to be minuscule.
    _____________________________

    "It's a new breed," Keeton said. "They're urban raccoons, and they're not afraid."
    i swear, some of you spurs fans are the most insensitive people in the history of humankind.
    Michael Jordan only won those championships because no one else wanted them at the time.
    I need circus music to watch Redskins special teams.

  17. #17
    Finals MVP - It's good. Obstructed_View's Avatar
    My Team
    San Antonio Spurs
    Post Count
    34,910
    It occurred to me the other day that the best point guard Westbrook has faced in the postseason is in practice. Parker might not run roughshod over him like he did in the regular season, but playing him to a standstill is still in the Spurs' favor. This looks like the Spurs' series to lose. Hope they take advantage.
    _____________________________

  18. #18
    Bonner/Blair can't do dat capek's Avatar
    My Team
    San Antonio Spurs
    Post Count
    3,521
    I don't see the benefit of it, tbh. The rebounding edge of Diaw over Leonard at the 4 isn't that substantial and he's not aggressive enough to take advantage of Durant in the post. Even though he's got the weight, Durant has a massive advantage in wingspan to counter that, and I think the refs will protect him down there. And it's not like Bonner will back down Durant.

    Unless Diaw buries Durant in the post every trip, what do we gain from that?

    Also, not sure how much Harden and Sefolosha even play together. I think Fisher is more of their smallball guy.
    I think we'd reap a few benefits, actually.

    1) Diaw has been our second best rebounder in the playoffs at 5.5 rpg, and our best offensive rebounder at 2 a game (1 more than Kawhi). The more he's on the court--especially when only 1 of the 4 of Collison/Ibaka/Perkins/Nazir is in the game--the better chance we have of getting extra shots, and not giving up extra shots or transition buckets.

    2) It's another way to potentially make Durant work on the defensive end. In this scenario, you would imagine that Durant would have to pick up Diaw on defense. Well, Diaw is really our only option of taking Durant to the post. Forcing Durant to bang in the post would be a great way to make sure he's as tired as possible when the fourth quarter rolls around. And when Durant is tired, he's more likely to jack up a bunch of deep, contested three's, as opposed to try to take his man off the dribble. Another big plus for us.

    3) Spacing. Both Bonner and Diaw can hit the three, so we don't lose anything by not matching small and playing Neal, and we gain the rebounding and taking Durant to the post.

    With Manu in the game, I'm sure Brooks will prefer to have Thabo in to guard him as opposed to putting Harden on him (though I'm sure we'll see some of that as well). Anyways, I'm not saying this would be a necessary adjustment. I'll take a small lineup of Tony/Neal, Manu, Green, Kawhi/SJax, and Duncan/Splitter against the Thunder's small lineup all day. I just think there are some opportunities to go big against their lineup that we should try out.

  19. #19
    Veteran Danny.Zhu's Avatar
    My Team
    San Antonio Spurs
    Post Count
    2,119
    Good read. Thanks.

    Spurs in 5.

  20. #20
    I love craft beer. Sense's Avatar
    My Team
    San Antonio Spurs
    Post Count
    10,767
    Great, great read Timvp! So glad you take your time to do these, you summed everything up.
    _____________________________

  21. #21
    Spur-taaaa TDMVPDPOY's Avatar
    My Team
    San Antonio Spurs
    Post Count
    34,048
    do you guys think the 3 scrubs at the end of the bench might get some real minutes if mismatches are a disadvantage to us when we in foul trouble?

  22. #22
    Silent Hill is Shit mkurts's Avatar
    My Team
    San Antonio Spurs
    Post Count
    124
    Good stuff timvp - I think the deepness of this year's Spurs team allows it to adapt and match up well against just about anybody.

    Favorites or not, need I remind everyone here of what happened during the last lockout shortened season, and the Spurs carrying a big unbeaten streak ?? We won the title.
    _____________________________

  23. #23
    Spur-taaaa TDMVPDPOY's Avatar
    My Team
    San Antonio Spurs
    Post Count
    34,048
    the way diaw has been playing through the 2 playoff series jumping for offensive rebs for 2nd chance points is going to win us games...the same cant be said about the scrub who loss his starting position to him

  24. #24
    OH YOU LIKE IT!!! slick'81's Avatar
    My Team
    San Antonio Spurs
    Post Count
    6,890
    love the take about defense while i wouldnt consider the spurs a defensive juggernaut theyve been solid for stretches and getting stops when they count so far this post season
    _____________________________

  25. #25
    "He's Manu Ginobili." senorglory's Avatar
    My Team
    San Antonio Spurs
    Post Count
    912
    when teams run with us, games get decided in our favor by third quarter. that's my impression.

  26. #26
    ...a.k.a. mAtT!iC3 mudyez's Avatar
    My Team
    San Antonio Spurs
    Post Count
    2,953
    thanks timvp (its more like 11 points)!

    believe! we will beat them... and I dont care how many games it will take us to do so!

  27. #27
    He's heating up DespЏrado's Avatar
    My Team
    San Antonio Spurs
    Post Count
    1,176
    This should be up for a pulitzer, great got damn analysis.
    _____________________________

  28. #28
    Thank You Indiana 100%duncan's Avatar
    My Team
    San Antonio Spurs
    Post Count
    14,541
    'Bout damn time. It's getting annoying that most of us here are afraid of the thunder to the point that they are slobbering over their asses. I am afraid of them too, but for God's sake have faith on our team.

    Believe.
    _____________________________

  29. #29
    The 6th is coming... will_spurs's Avatar
    My Team
    San Antonio Spurs
    Post Count
    3,023
    Over the last third of the regular season, the Spurs were in the top five or six in the NBA in terms of defensive efficiency. During the playoffs, the defensive stats have gotten even better: San Antonio has allowed only 97 points per 100 possessions. To put that in perspective, that's 6.3 points better than their defensive efficiency in the regular season. In fact, you can make a good case that the Spurs have played the best defense of any team in the playoffs.
    The addition of Diaw and Jackson can not be underestimated here. Both of them are difference-makers on D.

    Parker also improved his D a lot at the start of the playoffs (see the quotes from him and Pop re: his effort with the French NT). He seems possessed on that end.
    _____________________________
    "I am free of prejudice. I hate everyone equally." ~ W.C. Fields
    Co-Pope of the CoT


  30. #30
    Ya'll Ready For This? G-Nob's Avatar
    My Team
    San Antonio Spurs
    Post Count
    2,033
    The transition defense is probably the most crucial key to this series. Putting myself in Pop's shoes, I trap Durant every time he touches the ball. I'll treat Westbrook like cp3, rotating defensive players on him (tony,danny,kawhi). Force others to beat me. Nothing frustrates a team more than having to force up shots from their fourth or fifth options. Also, If the spurs can figure out a way to close the passing lanes and force turnovers, this series could be over a lot quicker than people realize.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •