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  1. #76
    Kang Trill Clinton's Avatar
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    Deputies shot and killed a man inside his Georgia home last month following an apparently bogus tip they received from a confessed meth addict and thief.
    East Dublin resident David Hooks, 59, was killed because, according to Laurens County Sheriff Bill Harrell, he aggressively brandished a gun at the SWAT team that broke in his back door. But Mitc Shook, a lawyer for Hooks’ widow, contends that the sheriff has misled the public about the shooting and raid, which turned up no drugs.
    The sheriff’s office obtained a search warrant based on a tip from a thief who claimed he had found 20 grams of methamphetamine inside a bag he stole from a vehicle at Hooks’ home, Georgia station WMAZ reports. According to the warrant, Rodney Garrett claimed that he thought the bag was filled with cash but that he later discovered it contained meth. Garrett said that he then turned himself into the sheriff’s office because the drugs made him fear for his safety.
    Garrett, a known drug abuser, also stole a second vehicle, a SUV, from the Hooks home.
    The word of a thief shouldn’t have been enough to obtain the warrant, Shook told the Macon Telegraph.
    He also disputes assertions that the sheriff’s office has made about Hooks’ killing.
    Sheriff’s deputies raided the home without identifying themselves, Shook said, contrary to their claims that they told Hooks they were officers with a search warrant. The sheriff’s office had also said they fired at Hooks for aggressively pointing a gun at them near the back door, but Shook alleges that the deputies blindly shot at Hooks through a wall without knowing who was there.
    When Hooks’ wife saw men in dark clothing heading for their home at 11 p.m. on Sept. 24, she woke up her husband and told him that the thieves who had stolen their SUV were back. Hooks grabbed a gun and headed to the door, according to Shook.
    Deputies shot more than 16 times, Shook said in a statement.
    Authorities searched Hooks’ home for 44 hours, but found no drugs, according to the Atlanta Journal-Cons ution. Hooks’ family says that he didn’t use drugs or sell them. They say he ran a successful construction company.
    Source

  2. #77
    Kang Trill Clinton's Avatar
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    y'all keep excusing trigger happy cops, though.

  3. #78
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    racist right-wingers HATE govt, except when the govt(police) are killing [email protected], esp unarmed [email protected], all of whom deserved to be murdered because ... whatever slander the police lays on them.

  4. #79
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    funny joke but its reality for some citizens.


  5. #80
    Yes. I sign my name. Slutter McGee's Avatar
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    racist right-wingers HATE govt, except when the govt(police) are killing [email protected], esp unarmed [email protected], all of whom deserved to be murdered because ... whatever slander the police lays on them.
    Quote from bouton's racist right wingers

    "When you couple this militarization of law enforcement with an erosion of civil liberties and due process ... we begin to have a very serious problem on our hands"

    ter McGee

  6. #81
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    Quote from bouton's racist right wingers

    "When you couple this militarization of law enforcement with an erosion of civil liberties and due process ... we begin to have a very serious problem on our hands"

    ter McGee
    get back to us when white supremacists/militia, NRA/GOA are out demonstrating in common cause with the Ferguson blacks.

  7. #82
    Yes. I sign my name. Slutter McGee's Avatar
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    get back to us when white supremacists/militia, NRA/GOA are out demonstrating in common cause with the Ferguson blacks.
    Because those groups are anti federal government. Not anti-local government. God forbid you actually think about this. The militia movement, as crazy and white as most of them are, have mostly eliminated their racist elements.

  8. #83
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    mostly eliminated their racist elements.
    really? link? evidence?

    to be right wing, to be Repug, to be a conservative, to be a ing policeman, etc, etc is to be white/Euro-American supremacist, or at very least a suppressor/oppressor of blacks.

  9. #84
    Yes. I sign my name. Slutter McGee's Avatar
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    Lets star with a large one. Take oath keepers for example. The group actually has black members. Most newer and larger groups, while primarily white, have much stronger libertarian influences. Militia groups that are actively racist tend.

    Here is a couple quotes from the cofounder of the Ohio militia

    The militia vehemently opposes the militarization of our law enforcement personnel; Those "peace officers" who can be found clad in their black Ninja-suits while they storm inner-city neighborhoods, indiscriminately shooting and beating residents as they fight their "War on Drugs".
    It was the militia who stood against the illegal searches and seizures in the urban neighborhoods of Chicago, Boston, Kansas City, Shreveport and other American cities. It was the militia that demanded Congressional Hearings into the atrocities committed by our Federal Government at Waco, Texas that culminated in the gruesome deaths of some 80 Christians, many of whom were Black Americans. It was the militia who exposed a campout where Federal, State, and Local Law Enforcement Agents passed out "Federal ****** Hunting Licenses" and denied entry to their Black co-workers while the Black Congressional Caucus and other "Civil Rights Groups" remained noticeably silent. And it was the militia who welcomed the inclusion of this Angry Black American Male who neither has or needs a "Federal Hunting License" !
    The KKK and the Aryan Nation neither invite or desire the presence of non-whites at their meetings. The militia does. The government controlled, main-stream press has deliberately created the fear and apprehension that keeps us apart. They fully understand and have implemented the undeniable truth found in the historic words of Benjamin Franklin: "Gentlemen, if we do not hang together, we will most assuredly hang separately". The militia does not hyphenate its membership. We are all Americans first.
    The militia movement has never really been about race at all, though it has attracted racist elements before. But liberal bull organizations like the SPLC have never bothered to differentiate them from groups like the KKK. Because that wouldn't promote the narrative that they want told.

    Now lets go to your next point. that being conservative means you are racist or oppressor of blacks. Sure some Republican policies have had racial impacts, and some have been flat out politically motivated. But it is the same with Democrats policies. The War on Drugs has been supported pretty heavily by both parties, and now you are seeing some politicians (in both parties) try to roll it back.

    Sorry, but your "Republicans = Evil Racist Bigots" views are simplistic and childish. They wouldn't elect black politicians if that was the case. Racist people don't elect people of different races into positions of power just because to prove they aren't racist.

    ter McGee

  10. #85
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    Private Donors Supply Spy Gear to Cops

    In 2007, as it pushed to build a state-of-the-art surveillance facility, the Los Angeles Police Department cast an acquisitive eye on software being developed by Palantir, a startup funded in part by the Central Intelligence Agency's venture capital arm.

    Originally designed for spy agencies, Palantir's technology allowed users to track individuals with unprecedented reach, connecting information from conventional sources like crime reports with more controversial data gathered by surveillance cameras and license plate readers that automatically, and indiscriminately, photographed passing cars.


    The LAPD could have used a small portion of its multibillion-dollar annual budget to purchase the software, but that would have meant going through a year-long process requiring public meetings, approval from the City Council, and, in some cases, compe ive bidding.

    There was a quicker, quieter way to get the software: as a gift from the Los Angeles Police Foundation, a private charity. In November 2007, at the behest of then Police Chief William Bratton, the foundation approached Target Corp., which contributed $200,000 to buy the software, said the foundation's executive director, Cecilia Glassman, in an interview. Then the foundation donated it to the police department.

    Across the nation, private foundations are increasingly being tapped to provide police with technology and weaponry that -- were it purchased with public money -- would come under far closer scrutiny.

    In Los Angeles, foundation money has been used to buy hundreds of thousands of dollars' worth of license plate readers, which were the subject of a civil-rights lawsuit filed against the region's law enforcement agencies by the American Civil Liberties Union of Southern California and the Electronic Frontier Foundation. (A judge rejected the groups' claims earlier this year.)


    Private funds also have been used to upgrade "Stingray" devices, which have triggered debate in numerous jurisdictions because they vacuum up records of cellphone metadata, calls, text messages and data transfers over a half-mile radius.


    New York and Los Angeles have the nation's oldest and most generous police foundations, each providing their city police departments with grants totaling about $3 million a year. But similar groups have sprouted up in dozens of jurisdictions, from Atlanta, Georgia, to Oakland, California. In Atlanta, the police foundation has bankrolled the surveillance cameras that now blanket the city, as well as the center where police officers monitor live video feeds.


    Proponents of these private fundraising efforts say they have become indispensable in an era of tightening budgets, helping police to acquire the ever-more sophisticated tools needed to combat modern crime.


    "There's very little discretionary money for the department," said Steve Soboroff, a businessman who is president of the Los Angeles Police Commission, the civilian board that oversees the LAPD's policies and operations. "A grant application to the foundation cuts all the red tape, or almost all of the red tape."


    But critics say
    police foundations operate with little transparency or oversight and can be a way for wealthy donors and corporations to influence law enforcement agencies' priorities.

    It's not uncommon for the same companies to be donors to the same police foundations that purchase their products for local police departments. Or for those companies also to be contractors for the same police agencies to which their products are being donated.


    "No one really knows what's going on," said Dadey of Citizens Union, a good government group in New York. "The public needs to know that these contributions are being made voluntarily and have no bearing on contracting decisions."


    Palantir, the recipient of the Los Angeles Police Foundation's largesse in 2008, donated $10,000 to become a three-star sponsor of the group's annual "Above and Beyond" awards ceremony in 2013 and has made similar-sized gifts to the New York police foundation. The privately held Palo Alto firm, which had estimated revenues of $250 million in 2011 and is preparing to go public, also has won millions of dollars of contracts from the Los Angeles and New York police departments over the last three years.


    Palantir officials did not respond to questions about its relationships with police departments and the foundations linked to them. The New York City Police Foundation did not answer questions about Palantir's donations, or its technology gifts to the NYPD.


    Donna Lieberman, executive director of the New York Civil Liberties Union, said she saw danger in the growing web of ties between police departments, foundations and private donors.


    "We run the risk of
    policy that is in the service of moneyed interests," she said.

    The nation's first police foundation was established in New York City in 1971 by the Association for a Better New York, a private group headed by real estate magnate Lewis Rudin.

    In the late 1970s, when violent crime soared and the city's finances were shaky, the foundation paid for bulletproof vests, which were distributed via a raffle. "It changed the administration into believing bulletproof vests are necessary equipment for the job," a former New York cop said.


    Altogether, the New York City Police Foundation has distributed more than $120 million in grants since it was set up and has spurred a host of imitators.


    One was the Los Angeles Police Foundation, which was founded in 1998 by then Police Chief Bernard Parks.


    Its first modest mission was to pay to outfit police units with medical kits to treat gunshot wounds. "There were incidents with officers injured and paramedics were getting there too late," said Parks, who is now a city councilman.


    Over its lifespan, the foundation has provided the LAPD with grants totaling more than $20 million, much of it to acquire uncontroversial items such as bicycles and police dogs.


    In New York and Los Angeles, it has long been true that top police officials have exercised considerable control over the use of foundation money.


    Glassman said that the chief of police's office deals directly with the Los Angeles foundation, identifying which products and services the department wants and who the vendor should be. At Bratton's direction, private donations paid for a team of consultants to devise a plan to reorganize the LAPD.


    According to press reports, Ray Kelly, New York's police commissioner for a brief stint in the early '90s and from 2002 to 2013, held similar sway with the New York City foundation. At his behest, foundation funds even paid for Kelly's membership at the Harvard Club, an NYPD spokesman confirmed.


    More recently, though, the New York and Los Angeles foundations have turned to funding technology initiatives, many of them involving surveillance systems.


    An audit included with the New York foundation's 2013 annual tax filing said almost half of the $6.5 million distributed by the group that year went to what it called the police department's "technology campaign."


    The foundation was given $4.6 million by JPMorgan Chase to buy 1,000 laptops and security monitoring software for the police department's main data center, according to the foundation's tax do entation and press releases from JP Morgan.


    Records for the Los Angeles foundation are more specific, showing outlays of almost $250,000 in 2010 for tracking equipment for the police department's counter-terrorism investigators and $460,000 in 2011 on surveillance cameras and license plate readers.


    According to its 2012 tax filing, the foundation gave almost $25,000 to upgrade "Stingray" devices placed in skid row to monitor drug transactions.


    Police boosters say there's no need for public debate over these types of acquisitions.


    "I think we all see ourselves as part of a larger puzzle, which is making sure that Los Angeles has a world class police department, and we're just the private funding source," said Glassman of the Police Foundation. "The commission is an oversight board and the department is here to protect and serve."


    But Peter Bibring of the ACLU of Southern California said that when police acquire new surveillance tools it can reshape their approach to policing – shifts that, when enabled by private money, are occurring outside public view.


    "These technologies are adopted without any kind of public discussion, without clear policies on how they should be used," he said.



  11. #86
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    As private charities, police foundations are subject to reporting rules set by the tax code rather than the public information laws that apply to law enforcement agencies. In many cases, foundations give few details about where their money comes from and even fewer about what it's used to buy.


    The New York City Police Foundation lists contributors who give $1,000 or more on its website, separating them into donors ($1,000-$5,000), benefactors ($5,000-$10,000), bronze ($10,000-$25,000), silver ($25,000-$50,000), gold ($50,000-$100,000) and platinum ($100,000 or more).


    The group offers no specifics at all on what its grants are used for, however. The police department's annual budget lumps them all into a single line item labeled "non-city funds."


    Despite the minimal amount of disclosure, it's clear that several companies are both vendors and donors to the New York foundation. Some also hold large contracts to supply goods and services to the police department.


    The NYPD's citywide surveillance hub uses software from IBM, which gave between $10,000 and 25,000 to the foundation. According to its website and tax do ents, the foundation helped fund creation of the hub. IBM did not respond when asked about its relationships with New York's police foundation and police department.


    DynTek Inc. made a contribution of similar size to the foundation and has won more than $47 million in technology contracts with New York City since 2008. It lobbied the police department for more business as recently as this January, according to disclosure records. DynTek officials also did not respond to questions.


    The New York Police Foundation's bylaws say it reviews potential conflicts of interest involving donors, but foundation officials did not respond to questions about this process.

    It appears that no one else is watching out for these overlapping relationships: New York's Comptroller and Conflict of Interest Board, which oversee procurement and conflicts of interest for the city, said they don't track the police foundation's donations to the police department.

    Los Angeles has put more protections in place –- at least on paper. According to the city's Administrative Code, the Police Commission must approve all foundation gifts to the police department. Donations with a value of more than $10,000 also must be approved by the City Council and its Public Safety Committee.


    Accompanying each donation is a signed assurance from LAPD staff that states, "all possible conflicts of interest have been researched, and this donation does not reflect negatively on the Department or City in general."


    In practice, though, the police commission puts donations from the foundation on its consent agenda, which typically passes with no discussion. In December 2013, for example, the commission approved a gift of 50 stun guns from TASER International Inc., valued at more than $48,000, in less than five seconds, video archives show. The donated models are an experimental product that LAPD officers are field testing for the company, according to city records. The City Council's Public Safety Committee and, later, the full council, also approved the donation with no debate.


    In some cases, foundations gifts may not be getting even this level of scrutiny. There's no indication in records that the City Council ever voted on or approved the 2007 donation of the Palantir software.


    A recent kerfuffle involving LAPD Officer Brandi Pearson, the daughter of Police Chief Charlie Beck, demonstrated the holes in vetting process for police foundation gifts. In March, the foundation paid $6,000 to buy a horse from Pearson, then donated it to the police department's mounted unit. Beck himself signed off on the foundation's purchase, but neither he nor foundation officials informed the Police Commission about the arrangement. Details of the horse's purchase only emerged this August when the Los Angeles Times got hold of the story.


    Ana Muniz, a former researcher with the Inglewood-based Youth Justice Coalition who has studied the LAPD's gang policing efforts, called the porous system for monitoring foundation donations unsettling.


    "At least with public contracts and spending, there's a facade of transparency and accountability," Muniz said. "With private partnerships, with private technology, there's nothing."


    Parks said that the Los Angeles foundation was supposed to avoid taking donations from companies if they were bidding on contracts for the police department, but acknowledged there are no rules barring this.


    As Motorola and Raytheon vied for a $600 million contract to provide the regional emergency communications system used by the LAPD, each company made generous donations to the police foundation.


    Motorola gave more than $164,000 through a foundation controlled by company executives in 2010 and 2011. It also appointed Bratton, who left the LAPD in October 2009, to its board of directors in December 2010, a post that paid $240,000 a year.


    "As part of our commitment to public safety, the Motorola Solutions Foundation, Motorola Solutions' philanthropic arm, supports public safety nonprofits that provide training for officers and safety education for the general public, as well as memorials to honor the service and sacrifice of fallen officers, and to help fund scholarships for their families," said Tama McWinney, a Motorola spokesperson, in a written response to questions about why the company had donated to the police foundation.


    Raytheon countered by donating $311,000 in equipment to the police foundation to upgrade the LAPD's existing radio system. "Our community engagement includes strategic partnerships, individual empowerment programs, employee volunteer efforts and regional projects that are aligned with support of first responders, education initiatives and our warfighters," Michael Doble, Raytheon's director of public relations, said in a statement.

    Motorola ended up winning the contract.

    Soboroff said he had no concerns that companies were donating to the foundation to improve their chances to do business with the city -- donors were typically driven by "an insatiable appe e to help," he said, not self-interest.


    At a recent fundraiser hosted by a wealthy family, members of the police department's canine, equestrian and SWAT units helped raise $180,000 to buy dogs, horses and equipment.


    "All they need to do is see a menu of what we need and they're willing to play," Soboroff said.


    Parks, however, said corporate donors should be seen with a more skeptical eye and that, in his view, it taints the contracting process when companies are allowed to make gifts to the same police agencies from which they are seeking work.


    "If you are taking money from Motorola and all of a sudden Motorola is providing you with your radios, those are major concerns," he said. "You should shy away from those relationships."


    Ultimately, Parks remains a supporter of police foundations and said Los Angeles' group has provided critical support to the city's police. But he has come to believe these groups need more substantial oversight than they are getting.


    "You have to be diligent to look at what people are purchasing," he said. "You don't want to say, when did we buy 50 drones?"

    http://www.propublica.org/article/pr...ailynewsletter

    And you gun fellatin rednecks think your 2nd Amendment fetish, and your Oath Keeper sheriffs, are gonna save your ass from the govt!



  12. #87
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    Arkansas Wants this Jail to Stop Torturing Kids




    http://www.alternet.org/civil-libert...er1022995&t=23

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    Yes. I sign my name. Slutter McGee's Avatar
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    What no reply? I gave evidence that militia groups tend NOT to be racist, and then I post a quote from the only Federal politician to visit Ferguson, and one of the first to speak out about against the police.

    But he is a Republican. Your imaginary little world of Bad Republicans and Good Democrats. It is a fantasy, one that most people get over around the age of 10.

    ter McGee

  14. #89
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    Judge Says Park Rangers Probably Shouldn’t Tase People With Off-Leash Doggies

    A federal magistrate judge awarded $50,000 to California man after a park ranger used a Taser on him during a confrontation over an unleashed dog.

    Gary Hesterberg was walking his two dogs Jan. 29, 2012, at Rancho Corral de Tierra, which had recently come under the oversight of National Park Rangers as part of the Golden Gate National Recreation Area.


    His rat terrier was off-leash,

    Park Ranger Sarah Cavallaro was only following orders when she issued Hesterberg a warning about a newly ins uted leash law at the park, but then things escalated when Hesterberg lied about his iden y, because apparently he feared the long leash of the law or something. When Hesterberg insisted that he’d received his warning and didn’t have to hang around anymore, Cavallaro told him, nuh-uh, he wasn’t allowed to leave because she had not identified him and given him a written warning, and also he was not respectin’ her authoriteh.

    So, like any logical law officer would do while giving out a leash-law warning, she pulled her Taser gun, aimed it at his chest, and told him to put his hands behind his back. According to court records:

    Hesterberg did not put his hands behind his back and instead asked her sarcastically and in disbelief, “What, you’re going to tase me now?” Hesterberg also told Cavallaro something close to, “Don’t tase me, I have a heart condition.” Cavallaro responded, “Well, then turn around and put your hands behind your back.” Hesterberg again did not put his hands behind his back. … Hesterberg turned to his right and began a slow jog south on the trail and got two to three strides into his jog when Cavallaro fired her taser in dart mode, striking Hesterberg in the back and buttock.

    Hesterberg fell face-first onto the trail’s “degraded asphalt,” and while Cavallaro cited him for “failure to obey a lawful order, providing false information and walking a dog off-leash,”


    the Department of the Interior says she “acted within agency policy and her training.”

    http://wonkette.com/563209/judge-says-park-rangers-probably-shouldnt-tase-people-with-off-leash-doggies

    If she had killed the guy with the Taser, she'd still have a job, just following orders, like "a good German".



  15. #90
    dangerous floater Winehole23's Avatar
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    warrantless anal searches in Tennessee:

    http://www.washingtonpost.com/news/t...-in-tennessee/

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    America is anally ed and un able. Any legislators even proposing bills to restrain the police?

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    Yes. I sign my name. Slutter McGee's Avatar
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    America is anally ed and un able. Any legislators even proposing bills to restrain the police?
    Actually yeah. Tea-Party Republicans and Progressive Democrats have been trying to get this done for a while. It has failed miserably every time.

    ter McGee

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    125 Seattle Cops Sue for 'Cons utional Right' to Use Excessive Force

    some 125 Seattle police officers responded by filing a lawsuit challenging the new laws. In their view, the new policies infringe on their rights to use as much force as they deem necessary in self-protection.

    They represent about ten percent of the Seattle Police Officers’ Guild membership. The police union itself declined to endorse the lawsuit.


    This week, a federal judge summarily rejected all of their claims, finding that they were without cons utional merit, and that she would have been surprised if such allegations of excessive force by officers did not lead to stricter standards.


    The officers claimed the policies infringed on their rights under their Second Amendment and under the Fourth, claiming a self-defense right to use force. Chief U.S. District Judge Marsha Pechman pointed out that the Second Amendment protects the right to bear arms — not the right to use them — and that the officers “grossly misconstrued” the Fourth Amendment when they claimed that it protects them, and not individuals who would be the subjects of police force or seizures.

    http://www.alternet.org/civil-libert...er1024345&t=19



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    CHP officer admits to sharing stolen nude photos of female suspects with fellow officers for years

    A California High Patrol officer accused of stealing nude photos from the cell phones of DUI suspects has told investigators he and other officers have been doing it for several years.According to do ents acquired by the Contra-Costa Times, CHP Officer Sean Harrington, who was accused of stealing photos earlier this week, confessed to stealing explicit photos from the cellphone of a second Contra Costa County DUI suspect in August and sharing them with fellow officers, describing it as a “game.”

    Harrington told investigators he has been stolen photos “half dozen times in the last several years,” forwarding them with leering text messages to fellow officer Officer Robert Hazelwood.


    The investigation into Harrington began following an Aug. 29 arrest of the San Ramon woman who discovered photos had been stolen from her phone five days after her release, when she noticed on her iPad that the photos had been sent to an unknown number. According to the woman, a record of the messages had been deleted from her iPhone but the information was available on the iPad which was synched to the phone.

    After contacting authorities, Contra Costa district attorney inspector Darryl Holcombe compared video surveillance and time-stamped text messages from the woman’s phone and determined Harrington was in possession of the woman’s phone at the moment the photos were forwarded. The woman was being processed in the Martinez County Jail at the time when the photos were stolen, according to court records.


    Harrington admitted under questioning that he stole five photographs from the woman and forwarded at least one to Hazelwood.

    http://www.rawstory.com/rs/2014/10/c...e+Raw+Story%29


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    ...
    Last edited by boutons_deux; 10-26-2014 at 05:05 AM.

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    Officer Shot And Killed Psychiatric Patient While Transporting Him To The Hospital

    Psychiatric patient Adam Daniel Lopp was being transferred to the hospital in a police vehicle when he was killed by an officer in Iredell County, North Carolina this week.

    Sgt. Scott Culler, a Davidson County deputy, said he he shot and killed Lopp on the side of Interstate 40 because he was under attack. Lopp, a 41-year-old patient who was involuntarily committed, has no known criminal history — not even an arrest, and other deputies did not report any other trouble with Lopp, according to local reporting by NBC Charlotte.

    The Iredell County Sheriff’s office said there was a confrontation betwen Culler and Lopp after Culler pulled over, and that it’s not clear whether the exchange started in the vehicle, which did not contain a par ion sometimes used for transport in police cars. Culler called for back-up, but he shot Lopp before other officers reported to the scene. Culler had no injuries. A spokesman for the department declined to comment to ThinkProgress on whether Lopp was armed or was restrained during transport, but there is no indication that Lopp had access to a weapon.


    The North Carolina State Bureau of Investigation is assessing whether criminal charges will be filed, and Culler is on administrative leave. But as a matter of department policy, Maj. Marty Byers of the Iredell County Sheriff’s Department told local news outlet The Dispatch that
    it’s not recommended “at all” to transport patients who are admitted to psychiatric hospitals without a par ion because it can threaten the safety of either the officer or the patient.

    http://thinkprogress.org/justice/201...-the-hospital/



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    Activist on Trial for Videotaping a Police Arrest, Called a 'Domestic Threat'

    A jury in Austin, Texas, is set to issue its decision today in a case that centers on a person’s right to film police officers. Antonio Buehler says he was at a gas station in the early morning hours of New Year’s Day in 2012 when he used his phone to take pictures of a woman being arrested and crying out for help.

    Ultimately, Buehler’s attempt to do ent what he felt was apparent police abuse ended with his own arrest when the officer said he felt Buehler spit on him.

    He faced a felony charge of "harassment of a public servant," and two to 10 years in prison.

    Last year, a grand jury cleared Buehler of the felony, but in an usual twist, it came back with

    a charge of "failure to obey a lawful order," a Class C misdemeanor punishable by a $500 fine.

    The order was for Buehler to put his hands behind his back as he tried to take pictures.

    Since then Buehler has co-founded the group Peaceful Streets Project, whose members record police and post the videos online, and train others to do the same.

    He has been arrested several more times while videotaping officers and has filed a federal civil rights lawsuit against the Austin Police Department.

    Buehler is an an Iraq War veteran and graduate of West Point and Stanford University with no prior arrests.

    "
    I’m a very lucky person.

    I’m a West Point, Stanford and Harvard grad.

    I have a lot of privilege.

    I have a lot of friends with money, and I’ve had a lot of people rally behind me.

    But what I hope that people see is if the Austin Police Department
    and the prosecutors are willing to expend such tremendous resources—they had eight prosecutors in the courtroom over the past couple days—if they’re willing to expend this much to try to ruin my life and to try to get me for a petty misdemeanor,

    I just imagine what they’re doing to people of color, to the homeless, to the mentally ill, and what they’re doing to cover up when cops really do bad things, such as killing or raping.
    "

    http://www.alternet.org/civil-libert...omestic-threat



  24. #99
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    Massive Study Reveals Schizophrenia's Genetic Roots


    http://www.scientificamerican.com/ar...A_EVO_20141103

    You'r mentally ill, now shown to be physicallyl disabled, so the chicken- , ignorant cops shoot you. It's their solution for everything.




  25. #100
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    Ferguson No-Fly Zone & A Brief Overview of a Tool Used to Restrict Freedom of the Press

    The Associated Press has reported that the United States government agreed to “restrict more than 37 square miles of airspace” over an area surrounding Ferguson, Missouri, for a period of 12 days in order to keep news helicopters from covering protests and the police response to them.

    The protests took place after Michael Brown, an unarmed black teenager, was gunned down on August 9 by a white Ferguson police officer named Darren Wilson. There were isolated reports of violence, however, for the most part, the people who came out to protest were predominantly engaged in peaceful assembly, commemorating Brown and calling for justice.


    The St. Louis County Police Department vehemently denies that a no-fly zone was imposed to restrict media access. Spokesperson Sgt. Brian Sc man declared in a statement, “The St. Louis County Police Department reaffirms the reason the request for restricted airspace was made was due to the hostile nature of certain persons on the ground that fired gunshots at the police helicopter, as well as used a laser device pointed at the police helicopter.”


    But the Associated Press’ report contains
    multiple quotes from Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) officials that indicate part of the motivation for the restricted airspace involved suppressing media.

    FAA air traffic managers “struggled to redefine the flight ban to let commercial flights operate at nearby Lambert-St. Louis International Airport and police helicopters fly through the area—but ban others.”

    In one recorded telephone conversation the AP obtained, an FAA manager says police “finally admitted it really was to keep the media out.”

    “Everybody but the media is okay,” according to
    another recording. “Right, right.”


    http://dissenter.firedoglake.com/2014/11/03/ferguson-no-fly-zone-a-brief-overview-of-a-tool-used-to-restrict-freedom-of-the-press/
    Last edited by boutons_deux; 11-03-2014 at 05:52 PM.

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