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  1. #101
    dangerous floater Winehole23's Avatar
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    using public safety as an excuse to quash news gathering? ing bullshit.

  2. #102
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    using public safety as an excuse to quash news gathering? ing bullshit.
    Welcome to the American Police State, you can't check out.

    Freedom!

    Liberty!

  3. #103
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    Florida Cop Breaks 14-Year-Old Girl’s Arm During Warrantless Cell Phone Search

    Florida parents are calling for a Greenacres Police Department officer to be fired after he reportedly broke their 14-year-old daughter’s arm while attempting a warrantless search of her cell phone.

    According to an arrest report published by the Broward-Palm Beach New Times this week, Officer Jared Nash explained that he approached the 14-year-old girl at John I. Leonard High School on Oct. 21 because he believed that she had video of a fight on her cell phone.


    Nash described the girl, who was talking on the cell phone, as “uncooperative.” He said that she pushed him back as she tried to get past him to walk away.


    “When she did this I took a hold of her left arm,” he wrote, adding that he gave her a verbal command to “stop and put the phone down.”


    “[She] then began to twist and pull her arm around in an increased physical level trying to pull away,” Nash explained. “I then tried placing [her] left hand behind her back to secure her in handcuffs due to her pushing me, her increasing attempts to break away from my grasp, and continuing to try hand the phone to [her friend] despite my orders not to.”


    Nash took the girl into custody, but she later complained of pain and was taken to Palms West Hospital, but his report does not mention what she was treated for. She was eventually charged with resisting an officer without violence.


    The girl’s father provided X-rays to blogger Davy V. showing multiple breaks in her arm.


    http://www.alternet.org/florida-cop-...l-phone-search

    she's lucky she didn't get tased or shot dead. 14 year old girls are horrible mortal threats to cops.





  4. #104
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  5. #105
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    More Federal Agencies Are Using Undercover Operations

    The federal government has significantly expanded undercover operations in recent years, with officers from at least 40 agencies posing as business people, welfare recipients, political protesters and even doctors or ministers to ferret out wrongdoing, records and interviews show.

    At the Supreme Court, small teams of undercover officers dress as students at large demonstrations outside the courthouse and join the protests to look for su ious activity, according to officials familiar with the practice.

    At the Internal Revenue Service, dozens of undercover agents chase suspected tax evaders worldwide, by posing as tax preparers or accountants or drug dealers or yacht buyers, court records show.


    At the Agriculture Department, more than 100 undercover agents pose as food stamp recipients at thousands of neighborhood stores to spot su ious vendors and fraud, officials said.



    Undercover work, inherently invasive and sometimes dangerous, was once largely the domain of the F.B.I. and a few other law enforcement agencies at the federal level. But outside public view, changes in policies and tactics over the last decade have resulted in undercover teams run by agencies in virtually every corner of the federal government, according to officials, former agents and documents.

    Some agency officials say such operations give them a powerful new tool to gather evidence in ways that standard law enforcement methods do not offer, leading to more prosecutions. But the broadened scope of undercover work, which can target specific individuals or categories of possible suspects, also raises concerns about civil liberties abuses and entrapment of unwitting targets. It has also resulted in hidden problems, with money gone missing, investigations compromised and agents sometimes left largely on their own for months or even years.


    “Done right, undercover work can be a very effective law enforcement method, but it carries serious risks and should only be undertaken with proper training, supervision and oversight,” said Michael German, a former F.B.I. undercover agent who is a fellow at New York University’s law school. “Ultimately it is government deceitfulness and participation in criminal activity, which is only justifiable when it is used to resolve the most serious crimes.”


    Some of the expanded undercover operations have resulted from heightened concern about domestic terrorism since the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks.


    But many operations are not linked to terrorism. Instead, they reflect a more aggressive approach to growing criminal activities like identity theft, online solicitation and human trafficking, or a push from Congress to crack down on more traditional crimes.


    At convenience stores, for example, undercover agents, sometimes using actual minors as decoys, look for illegal alcohol and cigarette sales, records show. At the Education Department, undercover agents of the Office of Inspector General infiltrate federally funded education programs looking for financial fraud.Medicare investigators sometimes pose as patients to gather evidence against health care providers. Officers at the Small Business Administration, NASA and the Smithsonian do undercover work as well, records show.


    Part of the appeal of undercover operations, some officials say, is that they can be an efficient way to make a case.


    “We’re getting the information directly from the bad guys — what more could you want?” said Thomas Hunker, a former police chief in Bal Harbour, Fla., whose department worked with federal customs and drug agents on hundreds of undercover money-laundering investigations in recent years.


    Mr. Hunker said sending federal and local agents undercover to meet with suspected money launderers “is a more direct approach than getting a tip and going out and doing all the legwork and going into a court mode.”


    “We don’t have to go back and interview witnesses and do search warrants and surveillance and all that,” he added.


    But the undercover work also led federal auditors to criticize his department for loose record-keeping and financial lapses, and Mr. Hunker was fired last year amid concerns about the operations.


    ‘A Critical Tool’


    Most undercover investigations never become public, but when they do, they can prove controversial. This month, James B. Comey, the director of the F.B.I., was forced to defend the bureau’s tactics after it was disclosed that an agent had posed as an Associated Press reporter in 2007 in trying to identify the source of bomb threats at a Lacey, Wash., high school. Responding to criticism from news media advocates, Mr. Comey wrote in a letter to The New York Times that “every undercover operation involves ‘deception,’ which has long been a critical tool in fighting crime.”


    Just weeks before, the Drug Enforcement Administration stoked controversy after disclosures that an undercover agent had created a fake Facebook page from the photos of a young woman in Watertown, N.Y. — without her knowledge — to lure drug suspects.


    And in what became a major political scandal for the Obama administration, agents from the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives allowed guns to slip into Mexico in 2011 in an undercover operation known as Fast and Furious.


    In response to that episode, the Justice Department issued new guidelines to prosecutors last year designed to tighten oversight of undercover operations and other “sensitive” investigative techniques, officials said. Before prosecutors approve such tactics, the previously undisclosed guidelines require that they consider whether an operation identifies a “clearly defined” objective, whether it is truly necessary, whether it targets “significant criminal actors or entities,” and other factors, the officials said.

    Peter Carr, a department spokesman, said that undercover operations are necessary in investigating crime but that agents and prosecutors must follow safeguards. “We encourage these operations even though they may involve some degree of risk,” he said.

    Those guidelines apply only to the law enforcement agencies overseen by the Justice Department. Within the Treasury Department, undercover agents at the I.R.S., for example, appear to have far more latitude than do those at many other agencies. I.R.S. rules say that, with prior approval, “an undercover employee or cooperating private individual may pose as an attorney, physician, clergyman or member of the news media.”


    An I.R.S. spokesman acknowledged that undercover investigators are allowed to pose in such roles with approval from senior officials. But the agency said in a statement that senior officials “are not aware of any investigations where special agents have ever posed as attorneys, physicians, members of the clergy or members of the press specifically to gain information from a privileged relationship.”


    The agency declined to say whether I.R.S. undercover agents have posed in these roles in an effort to get information that was not considered “privileged,” meaning the type of confidential information someone shares with a lawyer or doctor.


    José Marrero, a former I.R.S. supervisor in Miami, said he knew of situations in which tax investigators needed to assume the identity of doctors to gain the trust of a medical professional and develop evidence that is tightly held.


    “It’s very rare that you do that, but it does happen,” Mr. Marrero, who has a consulting firm in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., and continues to work with federal agents on undercover investigations, said in an interview. “These are very sensitive jobs, and they’re scrutinized more closely than others.”


    Oversight, though, can be minimal. A special committee meant to oversee undercover investigations at the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, for instance, did not meet in nearly seven years, according to the Justice Department’s inspector general. That inquiry found that more than $127 million worth of cigarettes purchased by the bureau disappeared in a series of undercover investigations that were aimed at tracing the black-market smuggling of cigarettes.


    In one investigation, the bureau paid an undercover informant from the tobacco industry nearly $5 million in “business expenses” for his help in the case. (The agency gained new authority in 2004 allowing it to take money seized in undercover investigations and “churn” it back into future operations, a source of millions in revenue.)


    Financial oversight was found lacking in the I.R.S.’s undercover operations as well. Detailed reviews of the money spent in some of its undercover operations took as long as four and a half years to complete, according to a 2012 review by the Treasury Department’s inspector general.


    Wires Crossed


    Across the federal government, undercover work has become common enough that undercover agents sometimes find themselves investigating a supposed criminal who turns out to be someone from a different agency, law enforcement officials said. In a few situations, agents have even drawn their weapons on each other before realizing that both worked for the federal government.


    “There are all sorts of stories about undercover operations gone bad,” Jeff Silk, a longtime undercover agent and supervisor at the Drug Enforcement Administration, said in an interview. “People are always tripping and falling over each other’s cases.”


    Mr. Silk, who retired this year, cited a case that he supervised in which the D.E.A. was wiretapping suspects in a drug ring in Atlanta, only to discover that undercover agents from Immigration and Customs Enforcement were trying to infiltrate the same ring. The F.B.I. and the New York Police Department were involved in the case as well.

    To avoid such problems, officials said, they have tightened “deconfliction” policies, which are designed to alert agencies about one another’s undercover operations. But problems have persisted, the officials said.

    It is impossible to tell how effective the government’s operations are or evaluate whether the benefits outweigh the costs, since little information about them is publicly disclosed. Most federal agencies declined to discuss the number of undercover agents they employed or the types of investigations they handled. The numbers are considered confidential and are not listed in public budget documents, and even Justice Department officials say they are uncertain how many agents work undercover.

    But current and former law enforcement officials said the number of federal agents doing such work appeared to total well into the thousands, with many agencies beefing up their ranks in recent years, or starting new undercover units. An intelligence official at the Department of Homeland Security, who spoke on condition of anonymity to discuss classified matters, said the agency alone spent $100 million annually on its undercover operations. With large numbers of undercover agents at the F.B.I. and elsewhere, the costs could reach hundreds of millions of dollars a year.

    In a sampling of such workers, an analysis of publicly available résumés showed that since 2001 more than 1,100 current or former federal employees across 40 agencies listed undercover work inside the United States as part of their duties. More than half of all the work they described is in pursuit of the illicit drug trade. Money laundering, gangs and organized crime investigations make up the second-largest group of operations.


    Significant growth in undercover work involves online activity, with agents taking to the Internet, posing as teenage girls to catch predators or intercepting emails and other messages, the documents noted. The F.B.I., Department of Homeland Security and Pentagon all have training programs for online undercover operations.


    Defendants who are prosecuted in undercover investigations often raise a defense of “entrapment,” asserting that agents essentially lured them into a criminal act, whether it is buying drugs from an undercover agent or providing fraudulent government services.


    But the entrapment defense rarely succeeds in court.


    In terrorism cases — the area in which the F.B.I. has used undercover stings most aggressively — prosecutors have a perfect record in defeating claims of entrapment. “I challenge you to find one of those cases in which the defendant has been acquitted asserting that defense,” Robert S. Mueller III, a former F.B.I. director, said at an appearance this year.


    The Times analysis showed that the military and its investigative agencies have almost as many undercover agents working inside the United States as does the F.B.I. While most of them are involved in internal policing of service members and defense contractors, a growing number are focused, in part, on the general public as part of joint federal task forces that combine military, intelligence and law enforcement specialists.


    At the Supreme Court, all of the court’s more than 150 police officers are trained in undercover tactics, according to a federal law enforcement official speaking on condition of anonymity because it involved internal security measures. At large protests over issues like abortion, small teams of undercover officers mill about — usually behind the crowd — to look for potential disturbances.


    The agents, often youthful looking, will typically “dress down” and wear backpacks to blend incon uously into the crowd, the official said.


    At one recent protest, an undercover agent — rather than a uniformed officer — went into the center of a crowd of protesters to check out a report of a su ious bag before determining there was no threat, the official said. The use of undercover officers is seen as a more effective way of monitoring large crowds.


    A Supreme Court spokesman, citing a policy of not discussing security practices, declined to talk about the use of undercover officers. Mr. German, the former F.B.I. undercover agent, said he was troubled to learn that the Supreme Court routinely used undercover officers to pose as demonstrators and monitor large protests.


    “There is a danger to democracy,” he said, “in having police infiltrate protests when there isn’t a reasonable basis to suspect criminality.”


    http://mobile.nytimes.com/2014/11/16...ions.html?_r=0

    But somehow, the SEC, FBI, Treasury, federal marshals just can't seem to infiltrate the financial sector that's stealing $100Bs/year and Ms of falsely foreclosed homes, but they put their jack boots on the necks of food stamp fraudsters and other small fry.



  6. #106
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    Man sues after Wisc. police come to his home, arrest him for calling them racists on Facebook

    http://www.rawstory.com/rs/2014/11/man-sues-after-minn-police-come-to-his-home-arrest-him-for-calling-them-racists-on-facebook/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaig n=Feed%3A+TheRawStory+%28The+Raw+Story%29


  7. #107
    coffee is for closers Infinite_limit's Avatar
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    Police Job is to keep individuals like Brown off the street. They did so....permanently.

    America is a better place today
    _____________________________

  8. #108

  9. #109
    🏆🏆🏆🏆🏆 ElNono's Avatar
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  10. #110

  11. #111
    Savvy Veteran spurraider21's Avatar
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    do you think this is a problem too?



    "We're called things like Uncle Toms and traitors to our community, in spite of the fact that we sympathize or we agree with the anger that our community holds, because we feel that same anger," said Noel Leader, a retired New York City police sergeant who in 1995 co-founded an advocacy group, 100 Blacks In Law Enforcement Who Care.

    http://www.cbsnews.com/news/amid-pro...race-and-duty/

  12. #112
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    Texas Cop Tasers 76-Year-Old Man with Expired Inspection

    A Texas police officer was placed on administrative leave on Friday after he reportedly used a Taser on a 76-year-old man after the suspect had already been forced to the ground.

    The Victoria Advocate reported that 76-year-old Pete Vasquez was driving a work-owned vehicle back to his place of business on Thursday when 23-year-old Officer Nathanial Robinson pulled him over for an expired inspection.


    Vasquez said that he explained that the car belonged to a car lot, and that the dealer tags made it exempt from having an inspection.


    But dashcam video obtained by the paper shows Robinson using force to arrest Vasquez for what should have been a Class C misdemeanor.

    In the video, Vasquez pulls his arm away from Robinson, and the officer slams him into the hood of the patrol car. The two men disappear from camera range as Robinson places Vasquez in a hold, and then forces him to the ground.


    According to police, Robinson shocked Vasquez with a Taser twice while he was on the ground.

    http://www.alternet.org/civil-libert...er1028681&t=18



  13. #113
    dangerous floater Winehole23's Avatar
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    Congress reauthorized legislation this week that will require states to report the number of people killed during an arrest or while in police custody.


    "You can't begin to improve the situation unless you know what the situation is," Rep. Bobby Scott (D-Va.), one of the bill's sponsors, said in an interview with the Washington Post. "We will now have the data."
    http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/...ice-shootings/

  14. #114
    Savvy Veteran spurraider21's Avatar
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    Texas Cop Tasers 76-Year-Old Man with Expired Inspection

    A Texas police officer was placed on administrative leave on Friday after he reportedly used a Taser on a 76-year-old man after the suspect had already been forced to the ground.

    The Victoria Advocate reported that 76-year-old Pete Vasquez was driving a work-owned vehicle back to his place of business on Thursday when 23-year-old Officer Nathanial Robinson pulled him over for an expired inspection.


    Vasquez said that he explained that the car belonged to a car lot, and that the dealer tags made it exempt from having an inspection.


    But dashcam video obtained by the paper shows Robinson using force to arrest Vasquez for what should have been a Class C misdemeanor.

    In the video, Vasquez pulls his arm away from Robinson, and the officer slams him into the hood of the patrol car. The two men disappear from camera range as Robinson places Vasquez in a hold, and then forces him to the ground.


    According to police, Robinson shocked Vasquez with a Taser twice while he was on the ground.

    http://www.alternet.org/civil-libert...er1028681&t=18


    ed up. i don't even get why the cop was cuffing/detaining him for that offense in the first place... per usual in these cases there was resistance, but not only was the cop in the wrong from the get-go, but then he went overboard with the taser (used it twice according to the article).

    its a good thing the chief spoke out the way he did. people get mad when they hear "administrative leave" but it makes more sense to review/investigate the situation before actually firing somebody. doesn't sound like they really have his back

    having more cameras on and around cops going forward will definitely be a good thing to avoid knee-jerk reactions

  15. #115
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    Florida cop suspended after bragging about causing the death of a tourist


    http://www.rawstory.com/rs/2014/12/f...e+Raw+Story%29

  16. #116
    Savvy Veteran spurraider21's Avatar
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    do you think this is a problem too?



    "We're called things like Uncle Toms and traitors to our community, in spite of the fact that we sympathize or we agree with the anger that our community holds, because we feel that same anger," said Noel Leader, a retired New York City police sergeant who in 1995 co-founded an advocacy group, 100 Blacks In Law Enforcement Who Care.

    http://www.cbsnews.com/news/amid-pro...race-and-duty/

  17. #117
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    "100 Blacks In Law Enforcement Who Care"

    black cops aren't the primary cops who need to care about blacks.



  18. #118
    Savvy Veteran spurraider21's Avatar
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    "100 Blacks In Law Enforcement Who Care"

    black cops aren't the primary cops who need to care about blacks.


    did you read the entirety of the article?

    do you not see the discrepancy in the #'s of white and black cops as an issue? particularly in areas that have high AA populations, where these racial tensions rise?

  19. #119
    Savvy Veteran spurraider21's Avatar
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    saw this posted of FB this morning, with the poster crying about injustice and police state, etc.

    are these warrior cops? or just a moron


  20. #120
    dangerous floater Winehole23's Avatar
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    The North Eastern Massachusetts Law Enforcement Council or (NEMLEC), was recently forced to take its website offline after a startling revelation was discovered on its “mission statement” page. The council is in charge of the region’s SWAT teams, and is currently the target of an ACLU lawsuit, which is hoping to force the agency to release their records to the public.


    When local reporters were researching the agency after the initial ACLU report this June, they discovered a disturbing section of the publicly posted mission statement, which claimed that the agency was formed in the 1960’s, primarily to fight against civil rights and anti-war protesters. Now, with the ACLU’s lawsuit against them drawing closer, the agency has taken down its entire website, and filed a motion for the lawsuit to be dismissed.


    The agency is claiming that they do not have to divulge their records because they are a private organization, however, they receive public funding and are comprised of public police forces.


    “NEMLEC can’t have it both ways,” said Kade Crockford, director of technology for the Massachusetts ACLU’s Liberty Project. “They can’t on the one hand raid homes to serve warrants and arrest people — performing public duties with public funds — and then turn around and say their activities should be shielded from public scrutiny because they’re private organizations. One of those things has to be illegal.”



    Before taking the website down, it contained a number of interesting passages, showing that SWAT teams were developed to be used against protesters and people in poor communities, especially during times of civil unrest.
    The disorder associated with suburban sprawl as people migrated from larger cities, the development of the interstate highway system, the civil rights movement and the growing resistance to the Vietnam War threatened to overwhelm the serenity of the quaint, idyllic New England towns north and west of Boston,” onepassage on the website read.
    Read more at http://thefreethoughtproject.com/swa...Iqc6uyu2rVw.99

  21. #121
    Savvy Veteran spurraider21's Avatar
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    0:45


  22. #122
    dangerous floater Winehole23's Avatar
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    Chad Chadwick has something many citizens can only covet - a spotless record.


    "These cops are out of control. They are ruining good people's lives. I am a good man. I have done everything I can to show that, as a father, as a citizen, as a worker," said Chadwick.
    But on the night of September 27th, 2011 Chadwick's commitment to living within the law did him no good at all.


    It started when a friend concerned for Chadwick's emotional well-being called Missouri City police to Chad's Sienna apartment where he'd been distraught, drinking and unknown to anyone, had gone to sleep in the bathtub.
    A SWAT team was summoned.


    "They told a judge I had hostages. They lied to a judge and told him I had hostages in my apartment and they needed to enter," said Chadwick.
    Chadwick did own a single shotgun, but had threatened no one, not even himself. Chadwick's firearm possession apparently prompted SWAT to kick in his door, launch a stun grenade into the bathroom and storm in, according to Chadwick, without announcing their identity.


    "While I had my hands up naked in the shower they shot me with a 40 millimeter non-lethal round," said Chadwick.
    A second stun grenade soon followed.


    "I turned away, the explosion went off, I opened my eyes the lights are out and here comes a shield with four or five guys behind it. They pinned me against the wall and proceeded to beat the crap out of me," said Chadwick.
    That's when officers shot the unarmed Chadwick in the back of the head with a Taser at point blank range.


    "They claimed I drew down with a shampoo bottle and a body wash bottle," said Chadwick.


    And it wasn't over.


    "They grabbed me by my the one hand that was out of the shower and grabbed me by my testicles slammed me on my face on the floor and proceeded to beat me more," said Chadwick.


    Chadwick, who hadn't broken a single law when SWAT burst through his door, was taken to the Ft. Bend County Jail with a fractured nose, bruised ribs and what's proven to be permanent hearing loss.
    He was held in an isolation cell for two full days.


    "Instead of apologizing to this man and asking let us see what we can do to help you to make you whole again, they concocted criminal charges against this man, one after another, after another," said Quanell X who believes the prosecution of Chadwick was designed to fend off civil liability.


    Ft. Bend County District Attorney John Healy sought to indict Chadwick on two felony counts of assaulting a police officer, but a Grand Jury said no law was broken.


    It could have stopped there, but Healy's prosecutors tried misdemeanor charges of resisting arrest, calling more than a dozen officers to testify. Those charges were dropped as well.


    A month ago, three years after the SWAT raid, a jury found Chad Chadwick not guilty of interfering with police. With tears in their eyes members of the jury offered the exonerated defendant comforting hugs.
    "They tried to make me a convict. It broke me financially, bankrupted me. I used my life savings, not to mention, I lost my kids," said Chadwick.


    "This type of police abuse and excessive use of force and concoction of criminal charges against innocent people is not just happening to black people, its happening to white people too," said Quanell X who is assisting Chadwick in getting the story of his ordeal to the media.


    For Chadwick some of the damage will never be repaired.


    "All I could think about is, what are my daughters going to think? My goal in life is to be a father that my kids are proud of. That's it," said Chadwick, a long time manager in the energy industry.


    The SWAT team that took Chadwick into custody and testified against him was comprised of officers from Missouri City, Sugar Land, Stafford and the Ft. Bend County Sheriff's Department.


    Ft. Bend County District Attorney John Healy declined to comment on camera, but did say he stands by his decision to prosecute Chadwick, despite the multiple no-bills and not guilty verdict.
    Asked how much the case cost taxpayers, Healy said "I wasn't keeping a tally."
    http://www.myfoxhouston.com/story/27...-swat-incident

  23. #123
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    New York City Cops Seek Federal Court Approval to Mass Arrest Protesters Without Warning


    the city’s Law Department is going back to federal court to seek new authority to make mass arrests at protests.

    The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit has agreed to meet in full to reconsider an August ruling that sided with protesters and chastized the New York Police Department for the way it herded and arrested 700 Occupy protesters on the Brooklyn Bridge in fall 2011. It concluded that the cops violated the protesters' constitutional rights and the police did not have “cause” to arrest them.

    “This decision will frustrate, not further, the work of police attempting to facilitate peaceful demonstrations while ensuring both the safety of demonstrators and those among whom demonstrations are staged,” the city’s rehearing brief argued.


    Attorneys representing the protesters say the NYPD seeks renewed power to make mass arrests after entrapping protesters, as was the case in October 2011, when police walked calmly beside Occupy marchers from lower Manhattan onto the bridge. As a majority on the lower Appeals Court panel noted, most protesters did not hear any arrest warning from police and felt they were led by cops onto the Brooklyn Bridge to continue their march.


    http://www.alternet.org/activism/new...ithout-warning



  24. #124
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    Family Owes $1 Million In Medical Bills Because Their Toddler Was Injured In SWAT Raid




    Officials in the Georgia country where the raid occurred maintains have refused to paythe Phonesavanhs’ bills, saying they are legally prohibited from doing so. A section of the state constitution stipulates that local government cannot “grant any donation or gratuity or to forgive any debt or obligation owing to the public.”

    The child, nicknamed “Bou Bou,” suffered serious burns and slipped into a medically induced coma after the grenade exploded. He was in a coma for five weeks, and hadextensive surgeries to repair his face and torso. Doctors are still trying to assess whether he will have lasting brain damage.

    Flash grenades in particular have a track record of harming children.

    In 2012, a 12-year-old girl in Montana
    suffered first degree burns after police detonated a flash grenade next to her bed. In 2010, a 7-year-old girl was killed in Detroit during a SWAT raid; her family says she was burned with a grenade before she was accidentally shot by the police.

    http://thinkprogress.org/health/2014...medical-bills/

    Where's Fox/Repug outrage? Congressional hearings? none? of course not, they're just foreigners, in the Confederacy, not Real Americans.



  25. #125
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    No Criminal Charges for Police Chief Who Asked Teenage Girl to Pose for Nude Photos





    ...
    to pose for nude photos in exchange for dropping charges against her for underage drinking.

    http://www.alternet.org/news-amp-pol...er1029458&t=15

    OTOH, if she had offered him $100 to let her off, he could have charged with bribery of public official.


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