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  1. #126
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    fake quote white flag.

    How many times will you surrender in this thread?

    He's the Frenchman of ST...except way more Ls

  2. #127
    🏆🏆🏆🏆🏆 ElNono's Avatar
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    Hope rmt is safe, tbh, just heard about the deadly accident in Florida

  3. #128
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    Hope rmt is safe, tbh, just heard about the deadly accident in Florida
    Thanks, it's further north. So tragic - I hear it's mostly kids.

  4. #129
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    Better than homeschool tbh
    I think that the perception of homeschooling will gradually change with the numerous online options available. Most homeschoolers I know NOW only do high school - basically virtual high school/dual enrollment with cc/univ - not the way I did homeschooling where I taught them to read and write and all the way up until I sent them to high school (didn't want to mess with the credits needed for college). I think it's great that there are so many options available (well, not in CA with its strong unions where you have to do public school or homeschooling - they can't mix and match the way we can in FL where I can teach, send them to 2 public school class like Spanish and take whichever accredited [free] Florida Virtual School classes I choose).

    BTW, after experiencing both systems, my kids all want to homeschool their kids (probably not feasible on one income these days). They see public school as inefficient, full of busy work, and restrictive. They love the freedom of homeschooling - doing everything off-season, time to do lots of activities (scouting, music, sports, reading FOR PLEASURE [which is virtually impossible with ps homework], pursuit of interest areas) and going at the pace of the individual student.

  5. #130
    VanillaPlayerFan BD24's Avatar
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    Yeah but you home school your kids while you lack basic reasoning skills. It’s terrifying having unqualified teachers.
    This idiot homeschools her kids? That’s pretty frightening tbh.

  6. #131
    Frumious Bandersnatch RandomGuy's Avatar
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    They left out the "re-education camps" for the capitalist heretics that have the audacity to try to create wealth.
    About the same way the Republican party platform left out shoveling jews and communists into ovens.

  7. #132
    生麦生米生ハメ baseline bum's Avatar
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    That's 3 of the dreaded "O" word - can't you find another word for the new year? That badly written do ent has overseen perhaps the greatest 200 years of prosperity ever.

    The whole first part of that New Green Deal involves taking from those who have and redistributing it. Do you think people are going to stand for that? I've seen it happen in Jamaica in the late 1970s. The Prime Minister, Michael Manley, got very close to Fidel Castro and resulted in the hollowing out of Jamaica's middle and upper class. Everyone with anything left - homes/buildings sold at basement bargain prices. The money and intellect left and went to Miami, New York or Toronto - leaving a huge gap and all the poor who couldn't afford to get out - not a pretty sight - inflation skyrocketed (believe it or not, I remember when a Jamaican dollar was worth more than an American dollar - now it's $128 JA to $1 US).

    Beyond the theft (because that's what it is), it does no one any good to be handed anything - that decreases motivation to strive and creates ill-will among families, population, etc.
    So you're a black Jamaican again mother er?

  8. #133
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    So you're a black Jamaican again mother er?
    Again, I never claimed to be black. Some posters just ASSUME that there are only black Jamaicans. Back in the day, Jamaica was a British colony (same as Hong Kong) so there was no visa needed to travel between the colonies - so many Chinese people came to Jamaica (same as Indians). My mother was born in Jamaica while my father and grandparents were born in China. From Wikipedia:

    Ethnic origins

    Jamaica's population, 1961–2003

    The streets of Montego Bay, Jamaica
    Ethnic Group %
    Black or Black Mixed[1] 92.1%
    Mixed non-Black[1] 6.1%
    Asian[1] 0.8%
    Other[1] 0.4%
    Unspecified[1] 0.7%
    The Jamaican national motto is 'Out of Many One People', based on the population's multiracial roots. The motto is represented on the Coat of Arms, showing a male and female member of the Taino Indian tribe standing on either side of a shield which bears a red cross with five golden pineapples.[64]

    Most of Jamaica's population is of African or partially African descent with many being able to trace their origins to the Western and Central African countries of Ghana and Cameroon,[65] as well as Europe[66] and Asia.[67] Like many other anglophone Caribbean countries, many Jamaicans with mixed ancestry self-report as black.[68] The prominent black nationalist Marcus Garvey is possibly the most famous Jamaican who was of full African heritage. Other famous full African Jamaicans include the Maroons of Accompong and other settlements, who were the descendants of escaped slaves that introduced the jerk cooking technique to the world. Many Maroons continue to have their own traditions and speak their own language, known locally as 'Kromanti'.

    It is extremely uncommon for Jamaicans to identify themselves by race as is prominent in countries like the United States where the race of a person is hyphenated with the ethnicity proceeding the nationality, for example, the American usage of the terms, White-American or African-American. Due to its history, most Jamaicans describe their nationality as a race in and of itself where they identify as simply being 'Jamaican' regardless of ethnicity.[69][68]

    Asians form the second-largest group and include Indo-Jamaicans and Chinese Jamaicans.[70] Most are descended from indentured workers brought by the British colonial government to fill labour shortages following the abolition of slavery in 1838. Prominent Indian Jamaicans include jockey Shaun Bridgmohan, who was the first Jamaican in the Kentucky Derby, and Miss Jamaica World and Miss Universe winner Yendi Phillips. The southwestern parish of Westmoreland is famous for its large population of Indo-Jamaicans.[71]

    Along with their Indian counterparts, Chinese Jamaicans have also played an integral part in Jamaica's community and history. Prominent descendants of this group include Canadian billionaire investor Michael Lee-Chin, supermodels Naomi Campbell and Tyson Beckford, and VP Records founder Vincent "Randy" Chin.


    Just as Wiki indicates, Jamaicans don't see race the way Americans do. There are so many inter-racial marriages, so many "mixed" children - it's just the way it is. I was astounded at the way Americans view race when it's no big deal where I come from. Here are some past Jamaican beauty queens - as you can see many are mixed race - mostly, the older pics.

    https://butterflyexpressions.wordpre...past-50-years/

    There was even a Chinese Miss Jamaica - Patsy Yuen, who placed 3rd in Miss World (second from the left):

    https://alchetron.com/Patsy-Yuen

  9. #134
    生麦生米生ハメ baseline bum's Avatar
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    Again, I never claimed to be black. Some posters just ASSUME that there are only black Jamaicans. Back in the day, Jamaica was a British colony (same as Hong Kong) so there was no visa needed to travel between the colonies - so many Chinese people came to Jamaica (same as Indians). My mother was born in Jamaica while my father and grandparents were born in China. From Wikipedia:

    Ethnic origins

    Jamaica's population, 1961–2003

    The streets of Montego Bay, Jamaica
    Ethnic Group %
    Black or Black Mixed[1] 92.1%
    Mixed non-Black[1] 6.1%
    Asian[1] 0.8%
    Other[1] 0.4%
    Unspecified[1] 0.7%
    The Jamaican national motto is 'Out of Many One People', based on the population's multiracial roots. The motto is represented on the Coat of Arms, showing a male and female member of the Taino Indian tribe standing on either side of a shield which bears a red cross with five golden pineapples.[64]

    Most of Jamaica's population is of African or partially African descent with many being able to trace their origins to the Western and Central African countries of Ghana and Cameroon,[65] as well as Europe[66] and Asia.[67] Like many other anglophone Caribbean countries, many Jamaicans with mixed ancestry self-report as black.[68] The prominent black nationalist Marcus Garvey is possibly the most famous Jamaican who was of full African heritage. Other famous full African Jamaicans include the Maroons of Accompong and other settlements, who were the descendants of escaped slaves that introduced the jerk cooking technique to the world. Many Maroons continue to have their own traditions and speak their own language, known locally as 'Kromanti'.

    It is extremely uncommon for Jamaicans to identify themselves by race as is prominent in countries like the United States where the race of a person is hyphenated with the ethnicity proceeding the nationality, for example, the American usage of the terms, White-American or African-American. Due to its history, most Jamaicans describe their nationality as a race in and of itself where they identify as simply being 'Jamaican' regardless of ethnicity.[69][68]

    Asians form the second-largest group and include Indo-Jamaicans and Chinese Jamaicans.[70] Most are descended from indentured workers brought by the British colonial government to fill labour shortages following the abolition of slavery in 1838. Prominent Indian Jamaicans include jockey Shaun Bridgmohan, who was the first Jamaican in the Kentucky Derby, and Miss Jamaica World and Miss Universe winner Yendi Phillips. The southwestern parish of Westmoreland is famous for its large population of Indo-Jamaicans.[71]

    Along with their Indian counterparts, Chinese Jamaicans have also played an integral part in Jamaica's community and history. Prominent descendants of this group include Canadian billionaire investor Michael Lee-Chin, supermodels Naomi Campbell and Tyson Beckford, and VP Records founder Vincent "Randy" Chin.


    Just as Wiki indicates, Jamaicans don't see race the way Americans do. There are so many inter-racial marriages, so many "mixed" children - it's just the way it is. I was astounded at the way Americans view race when it's no big deal where I come from. Here are some past Jamaican beauty queens - as you can see many are mixed race - mostly, the older pics.

    https://butterflyexpressions.wordpre...past-50-years/

    There was even a Chinese Miss Jamaica - Patsy Yuen, who placed 3rd in Miss World (second from the left):

    https://alchetron.com/Patsy-Yuen
    off Wild Cobra

  10. #135
    4-25-20 Will Hunting's Avatar
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    ^

  11. #136
    ( •_•)>⌐■-■ (⌐■_■) AaronY's Avatar
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    baseline bum's cyberbullying of a certain asian black female Trumper never gets old

  12. #137
    ( •_•)>⌐■-■ (⌐■_■) AaronY's Avatar
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    If there was a subforum here led "BB takes turns dribbling up from half court and dunking on rmt over and over" I would subscribe to every thread with email notifications turned on

  13. #138
    non-essential Chris's Avatar
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    This is a real thing.




  14. #139
    dangerous floater Winehole23's Avatar
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  15. #140
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    For 200M+ Americans, capitalism hasn't delivered The American Dream, or anywhere near it, so why not try democratic socialism?

    (because the oligarchy will spend $Bs to block democratic socialism and

    keep America as rigged Capitalism and DINO (democracy in name only, thanks to the ing Cons ution)

  16. #141
    LMAO koriwhat's Avatar
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    This is a real thing.



    he is such a ing re . how do these people get elected? the left is the party of re s.

  17. #142
    LMAO koriwhat's Avatar
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    For 200M+ Americans, capitalism hasn't delivered The American Dream, or anywhere near it, so why not try democratic socialism?

    (because the oligarchy will spend $Bs to block democratic socialism and

    keep America as rigged Capitalism and DINO (democracy in name only, thanks to the ing Cons ution)
    lmao slapping democratic in front of it doesn't mean anything just like slapping that on your party's label too. there's nothing democratic about socialism. you're a ing nut!

  18. #143
    dangerous floater Winehole23's Avatar
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    There are two planks of the GND which on their face do not directly relate to environmentalism: GBI and a federal jobs guarantee. It's been argued that theae relate due to jobs made obsolete due to the conversion to green enwrgy, but I digress...

    I didn't know there were already GBI studies done in the US, one has just been completed in Finland.

    Here's a link to a summary of the US studies: https://www.academia.edu/1159217/A_f...ax_experiments

  19. #144
    dangerous floater Winehole23's Avatar
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    climate change is a well known NATSEC threat, to wit,


  20. #145
    dangerous floater Winehole23's Avatar
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    Found the actual text:


    Summary of the Green New Deal
    The Green New Deal is a four part program for moving America quickly out of crisis into a secure, sustainable future. Inspired by the New Deal programs that helped us out of the Great Depression of the 1930s, the Green New Deal will provide similar relief and create an economy that makes our communities sustainable, healthy and just.

    THE FOUR PILLARS OF THE GREEN NEW DEAL
    I - THE ECONOMIC BILL OF RIGHTS
    Our country cannot truly move forward until the roots of inequality are pulled up, and the seeds of a new, healthier economy are planted. Thus, the Green New Deal begins with an Economic Bill of Rights that ensures all citizens: 1. The right to employment through a Full Employment Program that will create 25 million jobs by implementing a nationally funded, but locally controlled direct employment initiative replacing unemployment offices with local employment offices offering public sector jobs which are "stored" in job banks in order to take up any slack in private sector employment.

    Local communities will use a process of broad stakeholder input and democratic decisionmaking to fairly implement these programs.
    Pay-to-play prohibitions will ensure that campaign contributions or lobbying favors do not impact decision-making.
    We will end unemployment in America once and for all by guaranteeing a job at a living wage for every American willing and able to work.
    2. Worker's rights including the right to a living wage, to a safe workplace, to fair trade, and to organize a union at work without fear of firing or reprisal.

    3. The right to quality health care which will be achieved through a single-payer Medicare-for-All program.

    4. The right to a tuition-free, quality, federally funded, local controlled public education system from pre-school through college. We will also forgive student loan debt from the current era of unaffordable college education.

    5. The right to decent affordable housing, including an immediate halt to all foreclosures and evictions. We will:

    create a federal bank with local branches to take over homes with distressed mortgages and either restructure the mortgages to affordable levels, or if the occupants cannot afford a mortgage, rent homes to the occupants;
    expand rental and home ownership assistance;
    create ample public housing; and,
    offer capital grants to non-profit developers of affordable housing until all people can obtain decent housing at no more than 25% of their income.
    6. The right to accessible and affordable utilities – heat, electricity, phone, internet, and public transportation – through democratically run, publicly owned utilities that operate at cost, not for profit.

    7. The right to fair taxation that's distributed in proportion to ability to pay. In addition, corporate tax subsidies will be made transparent by detailing them in public budgets where they can be scrutinized, not hidden as tax breaks.

    II - A GREEN TRANSITION
    The second priority of the Green New Deal is a Green Transition Program that will convert the old, gray economy into a new, sustainable economy that is environmentally sound, economically viable and socially responsible. We will:

    1. Invest in green business by providing grants and low-interest loans to grow green businesses and cooperatives, with an emphasis on small, locally-based companies that keep the wealth created by local labor circulating in the community rather than being drained off to enrich absentee investors.

    2. Prioritize green research by redirecting research funds from fossil fuels and other dead-end industries toward research in wind, solar and geothermal. We will invest in research in sustainable, nontoxic materials, closed-loop cycles that eliminate waste and pollution, as well as organic agriculture, permaculture, and sustainable forestry.

    3. Provide green jobs by enacting the Full Employment Program which will directly provide 16 million jobs in sustainable energy and energy efficiency retrofitting, mass transit and "complete streets" that promote safe bike and pedestrian traffic, regional food systems based on sustainable organic agriculture, and clean manufacturing.

    III - REAL FINANCIAL REFORM
    The takeover of our economy by big banks and well-connected financiers has destabilized both our democracy and our economy. It's time to take Wall Street out of the driver's seat and to free the truly productive segments of working America to make this economy work for all of us. Real Financial Reform will:

    1. Relieve the debt overhang holding back the economy by reducing homeowner and student debt burdens.

    2. Democratize monetary policy to bring about public control of the money supply and credit creation. This means we'll nationalize the private bank-dominated Federal Reserve Banks and place them under a Monetary Authority within the Treasury Department.

    3. Break up the oversized banks that are "too big to fail."

    4. End taxpayer-funded bailouts for banks, insurers, and other financial companies. We'll use the FDIC resolution process for failed banks to reopen them as public banks where possible after failed loans and underlying assets are auctioned off.

    5. Regulate all financial derivatives and require them to be traded on open exchanges.

    6. Restore the Glass-Steagall separation of depository commercial banks from speculative investment banks.

    7. Establish a 90% tax on bonuses for bailed out bankers.

    8. Support the formation of federal, state, and municipal public-owned banks that function as non-profit utilities. Under the Green New Deal we will start building a financial system that is open, honest, stable, and serves the real economy rather than the phony economy of high finance.

    IV - A FUNCTIONING DEMOCRACY
    We won't get these vital reforms without a fourth and final set of reforms to give us a real, functioning democracy. Just as we are replacing the old economy with a new one, we need a new politics to restore the promise of American democracy. The New Green Deal will:

    1. Revoke corporate personhood by amending our Cons ution to make clear that corporations are not persons and money is not speech. Those rights belong to living, breathing human beings - not to business en ies controlled by the wealthy.

    2. Protect our right to vote by supporting Rep. Jesse Jackson, Jr.'s proposed "Right to Vote Amendment," to clarify to the Supreme Court that yes, we do have a cons utional right to vote.

    3. Enact the Voter Bill of Rights that will:

    guarantee us a voter-marked paper ballot for all voting;
    require that all votes are counted before election results are released;
    replace partisan oversight of elections with non-partisan election commissions;
    celebrate our democratic aspirations by making Election Day a national holiday;
    bring simplified, safe same-day voter registration to the nation so that no qualified voter is barred from the polls;
    do away with so-called "winner take all" elections in which the "winner" does not have the support of most of the voters, and replace that system with instant runoff voting and proportional representation, systems most advanced countries now use to good effect;
    replace big money control of election campaigns with full public financing and free and equal access to the airwaves;
    guarantee equal access to the ballot and to the debates to all qualified candidates;
    abolish the Electoral College and implement direct election of the President;
    restore the vote to ex-offenders who've paid their debt to society; and,
    enact Statehood for the District of Columbia so that those Americans have representation in Congress and full rights to self rule like the rest of us.
    4. Protect local democracy and democratic rights by commissioning a thorough review of federal preemption law and its impact on the practice of local democracy in the United States. This review will put at its center the "democracy question" – that is, what level of government is most open to democratic participation and most suited to protecting democratic rights.

    5. Create a Corporation for Economic Democracy, a new federal corporation (like the Corporation for Public Broadcasting) to provide publicity, training, education, and direct financing for cooperative development and for democratic reforms to make government agencies, private associations, and business enterprises more participatory.

    6. Strengthen media democracy by expanding federal support for locally-owned broadcast media and local print media.

    7. Protect our personal liberty and freedoms by:

    repealing the Patriot Act and those parts of the National Defense Authorization Act that violate our civil liberties;
    prohibiting the Department of Homeland Security and the FBI from conspiring with local police forces to suppress our freedoms of assembly and of speech; and,
    ending the war on immigrants – including the cruel, so-called "secure communities" program.
    8. Rein in the military-industrial complex by

    reducing military spending by 50% and closing U.S. military bases around the world;
    restoring the National Guard as the centerpiece of our system of national defense; and,
    creating a new round of nuclear disarmament initiatives.

    here's the draft text for the establishment of the select committee:

    https://docs.google.com/do ent/d/1...C9slHKLzo/edit
    bespoke public banks to partner with venture capital and the Federal Reserve to make the green grid?

    (C) The Plan for a Green New Deal (and the draft legislation) shall recognize that innovative public and other financing structures are a crucial component in achieving and furthering the goals and guidelines relating to social, economic, racial, regional and gender-based justice and equality and cooperative and public ownership set forth in paragraphs (2)(A)(i) and (6)(B). The Plan (and the draft legislation) shall, accordingly, ensure that the majority of financing of the Plan shall be accomplished by the federal government, using a combination of the Federal Reserve, a new public bank or system of regional and specialized public banks, public venture funds and such other vehicles or structures that the select committee deems appropriate, in order to ensure that interest and other investment returns generated from public investments made in connection with the Plan will be returned to the treasury, reduce taxpayer burden and allow for more investment.



    relevant again

  21. #146
    Frumious Bandersnatch RandomGuy's Avatar
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    he is such a ing re . how do these people get elected? the left is the party of re s.
    Matt.
    Goetz.

  22. #147
    dangerous floater Winehole23's Avatar
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    Echoes of TR's "New Nationalism" speech:

    Practical equality of opportunity for all citizens, when we achieve it, will have two great results. First, every man will have a fair chance to make of himself all that in him lies; to reach the highest point to which his capacities, unassisted by special privilege of his own and unhampered by the special privilege of others, can carry him, and to get for himself and his family substantially what he has earned. Second, equality of opportunity means that the commonwealth will get from every citizen the highest service of which he is capable. No man who carries the burden of the special privileges of another can give to the commonwealth that service to which it is fairly en led.

    I stand for the square deal. But when I say that I am for the square deal, I mean not merely that I stand for fair play under the present rules of the games, but that I stand for having those rules changed so as to work for a more substantial equality of opportunity and of reward for equally good service. One word of warning, which, I think, is hardly necessary in Kansas. When I say I want a square deal for the poor man, I do not mean that I want a square deal for the man who remains poor because he has not got the energy to work for himself. If a man who has had a chance will not make good, then he has got to quit. And you men of the Grand Army, you want justice for the brave man who fought, and punishment for the coward who shirked his work. Is not that so?...
    ..
    .Now, this means that our government, national and State, must be freed from the sinister influence or control of special interests. Exactly as the special interests of cotton and slavery threatened our political integrity before the Civil War, so now the great special business interests too often control and corrupt the men and methods of government for their own profit. We must drive the special interests out of politics. That is one of our tasks to-day. Every special interest is en led to justice - full, fair, and complete - and, now, mind you, if there were any attempt by mob-violence to plunder and work harm to the special interest, whatever it may be, and I most dislike and the wealthy man, whomsoever he may be, for whom I have the greatest contempt, I would fight for him, and you would if you were worth your salt. He should have justice. For every special interest is en led to justice, but not one is en led to a vote in Congress, to a voice on the bench, or to representation in any public office. The Cons ution guarantees protections to property, and we must make that promise good But it does not give the right of suffrage to any corporation. The true friend of property, the true conservative, is he who insists that property shall be the servant and not the master of the commonwealth; who insists that the creature of man's making shall be the servant and not the master of the man who made it. The citizens of the United States must effectively control the mighty commercial forces which they have themselves called into being.

    There can be no effective control of corporations while their political activity remains. To put an end to it will be neither a short nor an easy task, but it can be done....

    ...We must have complete and effective publicity of corporate affairs, so that people may know beyond peradventure whether the corporations obey the law and whether their management en les them to the confidence of the public. It is necessary that laws should be passed to prohibit the use of corporate funds directly or indirectly for political purposes; it is still more necessary that such laws should be thoroughly enforced. Corporate expenditures for political purposes, and especially such expenditures by public-service corporations, have supplied one of the principal sources of corruption in our political affairs.


    It has become entirely clear that we must have government supervision of the capitalization, not only of public-service corporations, including, particularly, railways, but of all corporations doing an interstate business. I do not wish to see the nation forced into the ownership of the railways if it can possibly be avoided, and the only alternative is thoroughgoing and effective regulation, which shall be based on a full knowledge of all the facts, including a physical valuation of property. This physical valuation is not needed, or, at least, is very rarely needed, for fixing rates; but it is needed as the basis of honest capitalization...

    ...We have come to recognize that franchises should never be granted except for a limited time, and never without proper provision for compensation to the public. It is my personal belief that the same kind and degree of control and supervision which should be exercised over public-service corporations should be extended also to combinations which control necessaries of life, such as meat, oil, and coal, or which deal in them on an important scale.


    ...The absence of effective State, and, especially, national, restraint upon unfair money-getting has tended to create a small class of enormously wealthy and economically powerful men, whose chief object is to hold and increase their power. The prime need is to change the conditions which enable these men to ac ulate power which is not for the general welfare that they should hold or exercise. We grudge no man a fortune which represents his own power and sagacity, when exercised with entire regard to the welfare of his fellows. Again, comrades over there, take the lesson from your own experience. Not only did you not grudge, but you gloried in the promotion of the great generals who gained their promotion by leading the army to victory. So it is with us. We grudge no man a fortune in civil life if it is honorably obtained and well used. It is not even enough that it should have gained without doing damage to the community. We should permit it to be gained only so long as the gaining represents benefit to the community. This, I know, implies a policy of a far more active governmental interference with social and economic conditions in this country than we have yet had, but I think we have got to face the fact that such an increase in governmental control is now necessary.

    ...The people of the United States suffer from periodical financial panics to a degree substantially unknown among the other nations which approach us in financial strength. There is no reason why we should suffer what they escape. It is of profound importance that our financial system should be promptly investigated, and so thoroughly and effectively revised as to make it certain that hereafter our currency will no longer fail at critical times to meet our needs...
    ...Of conservation I shall speak more at length elsewhere. Conservation means development as much as it does protection. I recognize the right and duty of this generation to develop and use the natural resources of our land; but I do not recognize the right to waste them, or to rob, by wasteful use, the generations that come after us. I ask nothing of the nation except that it so behave as each farmer here behaves with reference to his own children. That farmer is a poor creature who skins the land and leaves it worthless to his children. The farmer is a good farmer who, having enabled the land to support himself and to provide for the education of his children leaves it to them a little better than he found it himself. I believe the same thing of a nation.


    Moreover, I believe that the natural resources must be used for the benefit of all our people, and not monopolized for the benefit of the few, and here again is another case in which I am accused of taking a revolutionary at ude. People forget now that one hundred years ago there were public men of good character who advocated the nation selling its public lands in great quan ies, so that the nation could get the most money out of it, and giving it to the men who could cultivate it for their own uses. We took the proper democratic ground that the land should be granted in small sections to the men who were actually to till it and live on it. Now, with the water-power with the forests, with the mines, we are brought face to face with the fact that there are many people who will go with us in conserving the resources only if they are to be allowed to exploit them for their benefit. That is one of the fundamental reasons why the special interest should be driven out of politics. Of all the questions which can come before this nation, short of the actual preservation of its existence in a great war, there is none which compares in importance with the great central task of leaving this land even a better land for our descendants than it is for us, and training them into a better race to inhabit the land and pass it on. Conservation is a great moral issue for it involves the patriotic duty of insuring the safety and continuance of the nation. Let me add that the health and vitality of our people are at least as well worth conserving as their forests, waters, lands, and minerals, and in this great work the national government must bear a most important part.

    https://ehistory.osu.edu/exhibitions...newNationalism

  23. #148
    The Boognish FuzzyLumpkins's Avatar
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    It's interesting how people on this forum use these anonymous accounts in order to try to create new personalities.

    Reminds me of gender dysphoria

  24. #149
    dangerous floater Winehole23's Avatar
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    Ambitious discussion of the green growth vs. de-growth debate. The authors are UK based, so are most of the policy links.



    What does ending our growth dependence mean in practice?

    In a report published this week by the University of Leeds, Dan O’Neill and I outline four critical strategies required to alleviate our dependence on growth, and highlight some opportunities for advancing these strategies as part of our COVID-19 recovery planning.

    Shift the balance of power in workplaces

    All else being equal, automation and other innovations gradually reduce the need for labour. Conventional economic wisdom says we must stimulate consumption growth to soak up the surplus labour. But there is an alternative and more environmentally sustainable way to maintain employment: share out the remaining work. Instead of using productivity improvements to drive down prices and sell more goods, companies could offer workers a shorter working weekat a higher hourly pay rate.

    This is not a solution that profit-oriented companies are likely to deliver of their own accord. It will require coordination, and a major shift in the balance of power in work places, so that those who invest their labour are no longer systematically excluded from decision-making. The way that many corporations have behaved during this crisis — funnelling bailout money to shareholders while firing workers — merely underlines the need for such a fundamental redesign of corporate governance.

    Reduce our exposure to private debt crises

    We are dependent on growth to maintain financial stability because our economy is heavily burdened with private debt. Debts are promises to pay, often based on expectations about the future — usually of revenue growth or asset price growth. If those expectations don’t come to pass, debt obligations can become dangerously destructive. Unlike equity investments that shrink or grow with the fortunes of the firm, debts are fixed in nominal terms, and if the interest cannot be paid, they grow exponentially. Thus, high levels of private indebtedness can transform a modest fall in expected growth rates into a full-blown crisis.

    It is worth stressing that public debt is not the concern here. We must resist any attempt to use our coronavirus debts as justification for a new round of austerity. Such cuts would be both unnecessary and counter-productive. First, 42% of our public debt (£875 billion) is owed to our own central bank, and can be rolled over indefinitely (as Japan has demonstrated). Second, with the cost of government borrowing negative in real terms this is the perfect time for the government to borrow to invest. Creditors are effectively paying for the privilege of holding government debt. Third, if the government were to try to cut back on spending to pay down the public debt it would simply suck more demand out of the system, and push more households and businesses into debt, exactly as the last round of austerity did.

    The focus right now should be on reducing our exposure to private debt crises, by regulating to reduce exploitative and inflationary forms of lending (e.g. excessive mortgage lending), correcting the bias toward debt over equity in our tax system, clamping down on the use of debt for tax avoidance purposes, facilitating debt write-downsfor households in problem debt, and restructuring our banking system to improve financial resilience.

    Tackle rent extraction

    Growth is required to protect the privileges of landlords, financiers, monopoly interests, and other “rentiers”. Rentiers do not create wealth; they extract wealth through their control of monopolised and scarce assets. As long as the economic growth rate remains higher than the rate of rent extraction, this injustice can be masked to some extent. But when growth stalls — while landlords, financiers, monopoly interests, and other rentiers continue to ac ulate assets — the result is rising inequality. All the growth dependencies outlined here can, on some level, be understood as manifestations of a rentier growth imperative.

    Diffusing rentier power will require structural changes right across the economy, from the governance of platforms like Facebook, Uber and Amazon, to the intellectual property regime. Right now, with tax revenues from employment and consumption dramatically reduced, we have an opportunity to push for fairer taxation of capital gains, dividends, and monopoly profits. Mounting rent arrears and the growing power of renters unions could also create an impetus for a fundamental shift in the ownership and governance of land and housing.

    Safeguard basic needs

    High levels of unemployment, indebtedness, and rent extraction are all-the-more dangerous in an economy like the UK, where essential goods and services like social care, energy, and transport are rationed by price — i.e. by ability to pay. In this context, the ability of the poorest to meet their basic needs is threatened by a fall in income, or a rise in prices. This is also why carbon taxes — which are essential to meet our climate obligations — are so difficult to introduce under the current system.

    There is nothing natural or inevitable about this reality. Land, water, raw materials, and energy resources are gifts from nature — common resources that still account for more than half of our national wealth. In an ideal world, the rents arising from control of these common assets would be captured and invested in collective services and a strong social safety net, to ensure that nobody goes short on life’s essentials. Instead we have allowed private interests to profit from the control and exploitation of our common resources. Over recent decades, much of our publicly funded infrastructure has also been privatised, leading to rising prices for essential services like energy, transport, and water.

    To increase society’s resilience in the face of economic contraction, we must gradually correct these injustices. First steps should include strengthening our social safety net and building better public services that meet people’s basic needs. Right now, with care providers calling for public bailouts, there may be an opportunity to de-financialise and democratise adult social care. With customers going into arrears on their utility bills, and many transport companies in need of extensive public support in the wake of COVID-19, this would also be a good time to extend the principle of free basic en lements to our transport and energy systems.
    https://www.opendemocracy.net/en/our...missing-point/

  25. #150
    dangerous floater Winehole23's Avatar
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