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  1. #26
    Veteran hater's Avatar
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    That's not true. Some treatments, like Regeneron's antibody tail, are both preventative and therapeutic.
    Ok. But at what point would a dr prescribe you such preventative? And treatments also have side effects. Not to mention costs.

    In other words its similar the chloroquine scenario. I would not take it unless I have bad symptoms and theres nothing else to take

  2. #27
    Veteran vy65's Avatar
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    Ok. But at what point would a dr prescribe you such preventative? And treatments also have side effects. Not to mention costs.

    In other words its similar the chloroquine scenario. I would not take it unless I have bad symptoms and theres nothing else to take
    I think the idea is to take the antibody treatment like a vaccine until an actual vaccine is made. Everything has side-effects and costs, but what's been shown is pretty promising. And this is not like the hydroxychloroquine scenario.

  3. #28
    R.C. Drunkford TimDunkem's Avatar
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    ^I'm sure it will be totally cheap and widely available.

  4. #29
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    ^I'm sure it will be totally cheap and widely available.
    I have my doubts that a magic pill will be widely available anytime soon.

    Id give it 6 months min.

  5. #30
    Veteran vy65's Avatar
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    ^I'm sure it will be totally cheap and widely available.
    Probably not

  6. #31
    R.C. Drunkford TimDunkem's Avatar
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    Oh...

  7. #32
    Veteran vy65's Avatar
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    What was the point of this exchange? Do you think you accomplished something?

  8. #33
    R.C. Drunkford TimDunkem's Avatar
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    What was the point of this exchange? Do you think you accomplished something?
    Woah hostile much? Relax, madam.

  9. #34
    Veteran vy65's Avatar
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    Woah hostile much? Relax, madam.
    Not hostile at all, just asking a simple question.

  10. #35
    R.C. Drunkford TimDunkem's Avatar
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    Not hostile at all, just asking a simple question.
    Just a lil hostile, tbh.

  11. #36
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    Just a lil hostile, tbh.
    If you say so sweetcheeks.

  12. #37
    R.C. Drunkford TimDunkem's Avatar
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    If you say so sweetcheeks.
    Thanks, ma'.

  13. #38
    🏆🏆🏆🏆🏆 ElNono's Avatar
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    The current approach to dealing with COVID-19 carries significant risks to overall population health and threatens to increase inequities across the country. Aiming to prevent or contain every case of COVID-19 is simply no longer sustainable at this stage in the pandemic. We need to accept that COVID-19 will be with us for some time and to find ways to deal with it.

    The current and proposed measures for reopening will continue to disproportionately impact lower income groups, Black and other racialized groups, recent immigrants to Canada, Indigenous peoples and other populations. And it risks significantly harming our children, particularly the very young, by affecting their development, with life-long consequences in terms of education, skills development, income and overall health.

    Canada must work to minimize the impact of COVID-19 by using measures that are practical, effective and compatible with our values and sense of social justice. We need to focus on preventing deaths and serious illness by protecting the vulnerable while enabling society to function and thrive.

    Elimination of COVID-19 is not a practical objective for Canada until we have a vaccine. While there is hope for a vaccine to be developed soon, we must be realistic about the time it will actually take to develop and evaluate it and then deliver an immunization campaign covering the entire population. We cannot sustain universal control measures indefinitely.

    We need to accept that there will be cases and outbreaks of COVID-19. We need localized control measures that are risk-based. We should consistently reassess quarantine and isolation periods, recommendations for physical distancing and non-medical masks, and travel restrictions based on current best evidence and levels of risk.

    At the same time we must improve infection prevention and control in long-term care and congregate living settings. We should provide support for people living in the community who need to or choose to isolate when the disease is active, as well as those who have been adversely affected by COVID-19, or the consequences of the public health measures.

    Canadians have developed a fear of COVID-19. Going forward, they have to be supported in understanding their true level of risk, and learning how to deal with this disease, while getting on with their lives Ė back to work, back to school, and back to healthy lives and vibrant, active communities across this country.

    We acknowledge the heroic work that has been done in recent months by many across all levels of government and the public and private sector, and the sacrifices that Canadians have made to get to this stage. As we look forward, Canada must balance its response to COVID-19.

    Meanwhile, one prominent epidemiologist was highly critical of the letter and its assertion concerning premature mortality, calling it "damaging and unfortunate."

    Dr. David Fisman, an epidemiology professor at the Dalla Lana School of Public Health, told QP Briefing the letter writers "are out of the loop and don't have the standing to speak about mortality," as the only reason deaths under age 50 have been relatively rare is because public health interventions have been successful.

    "I think you can look south of the border and see where the approach they advocate leads," he wrote in an email. "In the U.S., which has had a less aggressive control response, they're at 2.5 Vietnam wars worth of casualties (130,000 deaths) since March," he wrote. "Those deaths occur in all age groups, though mortality takes off sharply after age 50."

    In contrast, Canada is doing relatively well in a difficult global context, with economic and social life reopening as COVID-19 becomes more under control, Fisman said.

    https://www.qpbriefing.com/2020/07/0...alth-measures/

  14. #39
    R.C. Drunkford TimDunkem's Avatar
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    Bwahaha thldren pwned again

  15. #40
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    WHO revises things that we already knew

    - its airborne
    - asymptomatics can transmit it
    - everyone should wear a mask

    I been calling alm these since early January

    Called it

  16. #41
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    Meanwhile, one prominent epidemiologist was highly critical of the letter and its assertion concerning premature mortality, calling it "damaging and unfortunate."

    Dr. David Fisman, an epidemiology professor at the Dalla Lana School of Public Health, told QP Briefing the letter writers "are out of the loop and don't have the standing to speak about mortality," as the only reason deaths under age 50 have been relatively rare is because public health interventions have been successful.

    "I think you can look south of the border and see where the approach they advocate leads," he wrote in an email. "In the U.S., which has had a less aggressive control response, they're at 2.5 Vietnam wars worth of casualties (130,000 deaths) since March," he wrote. "Those deaths occur in all age groups, though mortality takes off sharply after age 50."

    In contrast, Canada is doing relatively well in a difficult global context, with economic and social life reopening as COVID-19 becomes more under control, Fisman said.

    https://www.qpbriefing.com/2020/07/0...alth-measures/
    Ireland also admitting overcount of covid death.

    Effectively, it concludes that we have overestimated the death toll directly attributed to Covid-19 by 637 people.

    When one considers that the total deaths attributable to the virus during the period of the HIQA analysis was 1,709, it's an overestimation of quite a very large amount.

    The implication then is that the official daily figure which was 1,709 may overstate the actual excess deaths due to Covid-19 by 59.4%.

    There are a few reasons why that surprising outcome may have occurred.

    The first is that since the middle of April, Ireland is one of the very few countries in Europe that has included suspected or probable Covid-19 deaths in our overall totals alongside deaths confirmed to have been caused by Covid-19.

    Perhaps many of those probable and suspected cases may not have the virus in the first place.

    A second, which is referred to in the report is that - since we know that the vast majority of those who have died from Covid-19 also suffered from a range of serious underlying conditions, including heart disease and cancer - it may be that the actual cause of death in some such cases was the underlying condition rather than the coronavirus itself

  17. #42
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    Looks like Russia will be first

    Should have available vaccines by end of year




    Suppossedly they will share it with the world

  18. #43
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    China should be on same path or faster.

    Sure I would not take one till its had 6-12 months age

    But if I was an old man with cancer....

  19. #44
    my unders, my frgn whites pgardn's Avatar
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    WHO revises things that we already knew

    - its airborne
    - asymptomatics can transmit it
    - everyone should wear a mask

    I been calling alm these since early January

    Called it
    The WHO never said it was not airborne.
    they said there was not enough scientific evidence
    aerosols and stuff are very difficult to experiment on and get clear consistent results

    The cir stantial evidence was overwhelming however, they were sticking with what happens with most other viruses. we do know the virus can become distributed as an aerosol, we do not know if this is enough to get the disease. cir stantial evidence says if you sit in a room with air that is not circulating for a long enough time that the aerosol based virus is most likely enough to get the disease

    A proper leader would have told us the problems and explain this so people would not go all bonkers. Again this is not easy stuff

  20. #45
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    I think the evidence was there.

    Just that it was also a political decision. It always is.

    If they rule it airborne new directions would be included which would have made busisinesses completely close. Economies collapse even more. Etc

    Bug maybe just maybe this would have been controlled.

    Now its out of control

  21. #46
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    The WHO never said it was not airborne.
    The WHO, as a result of 100s of scientists reporting so, are now saying it is airborne.

  22. #47
    my unders, my frgn whites pgardn's Avatar
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    The WHO, as a result of 100s of scientists reporting so, are now saying it is airborne.
    Yes they are.
    Because the scientist that work closely with the aerosol science and climatology say that it is high probability.
    NOW. Btw the scientist writing and urging them is partially how this is suppose to work. The WHO are not experts at everything.
    They are not loaded with scientists who work with aerosols.

    We did not know early on. We just did not. We thought it was contact with hands and or large stuff in the air.
    Hindsight is always easy. Im not saying they have done everything correctly; its very difficult to move large organizations that want to be correct and not risk new ideas.

    On the other hand its extraordinarily easy for an individual to make a you tube and call it truth.
    You can ask TGY and Spurter all about that.

  23. #48
    my unders, my frgn whites pgardn's Avatar
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    YOu think the cir stantial evidence was there. The aerosol stuff had not been studied well enough. Its still mainly the realm of Climatologists.

    Just that it was also a political decision. It always is.

    If they rule it airborne new directions would be included which would have made busisinesses completely close. Economies collapse even more. Etc

    Bug maybe just maybe this would have been controlled.

    Now its out of control

  24. #49
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    Gilead Sciences published new data Friday on its antiviral drug remdesivir that shows it reduced the risk of death for severely sick coronavirus patients by 62% compared with standard care alone.

    https://www.cnbc.com/2020/07/10/gile...-of-death.html

  25. #50
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    Gilead Sciences published new data Friday on its antiviral drug remdesivir that shows it reduced the risk of death for severely sick coronavirus patients by 62% compared with standard care alone.

    https://www.cnbc.com/2020/07/10/gile...-of-death.html
    originally, 25% to 30%, now up to 62%. Investors must have been complaining.

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