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  1. #1
    🏆🏆🏆🏆🏆 ElNono's Avatar
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    "Monsanto went after hundreds of farmers for infringing on their patented seed after audits revealed that their farms had contained their product — as a result of routine pollination by animals and acts of nature. Unable to afford a proper defense, competing small farms have been bought out by the company in droves. As a result, Monsanto saw their profits increase by the hundreds of millions over the last few years as a result. Between 1997 and 2010, Monsanto tackled 144 organic farms with lawsuits and investigated roughly 500 plantations annually during that span with a so-called 'seed police.'"

  2. #2
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    Monsanto is ing evil. Predatory, unethical, toxic, poisonous. When GMOs is finally shown to cause diseases and birth defects, Monsanto will declare bankruptcy and escape.

  3. #3
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    don't each of the 300,000 have to individually sue since they outlawed suing corporations as a group?

  4. #4
    🏆🏆🏆🏆🏆 ElNono's Avatar
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    don't each of the 300,000 have to individually sue since they outlawed suing corporations as a group?
    It wasn't outlawed, it was simply made more restricted. And IIRC, it's only 7 or 8 individuals suing in representation of the 300,000.

  5. #5
    dangerous floater Winehole23's Avatar
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    tide turning? It turned already in Europe.

  6. #6
    Veteran Wild Cobra's Avatar
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    I'd like to know how Monsanto thinks they have a case for their spurious pollen... If they are concerned about others obtaining their genetics, then they should make damn sure it isn't in the environment.

  7. #7
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    SCOTUS will protect Monsanto, Dow, etc. no worries.

    Monsanto has private s going around, sampling fields, shaking down farmers, exactly like patent trolls.

    The "free market" and corps are to be trusted/unregulated, because they do The Right Thing.

  8. #8
    Damns (Given): 0 Blake's Avatar
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    tide turning? It turned already in Europe.
    Seems like America is always late to those tide turning parties.

  9. #9
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    BPA is outlawed Europe, but UCA corrupts FDA/Congress into protecting UCA profits way ahead of Human-Americans health.

    BPA's Obesity And Diabetes Link Strengthened By New Study

    he modern lifestyle of super-sized french fries and couch potatoes often takes the blame for the rising rates of obesity and diabetes in the U.S. -- perhaps rightly so. But growing evidence suggests another factor in the dual epidemics: modern chemicals.

    Exposure to even minuscule amounts of synthesized substances -- used in everything from pesticides to water bottles -- can scramble hormone signals, scientists say. This interference can trick fat cells into taking in more fat or mislead the pancreas into secreting excess insulin, a hormone that regulates the breakdown of fat and carbohydrates.

    Among the most ubiquitous and scrutinized of these so-called endocrine disruptors is bisphenol A, better known as BPA. The chemical is a common ingredient in plastics and food-can linings.

    "When you eat something with BPA, it's like telling your organs that you are eating more than you are really eating," says Angel Nadal, a BPA expert at the Miguel Hernendez University in Spain.

    "People are seeing effects of BPA down to 1000-fold below [Nadal's threshold]," adds Frederick vom Saal, another expert in endocrine disruptors at the University of Missouri-Columbia. "It takes so little of this chemical to cause harm."

    Nadal adds that BPA is just one of a larger tail of at least 20 endocrine disruptors commonly used in everyday items, including phthalates, nicotine, dioxin, arsenic and tributyltin. Further, obesity and diabetes aren't the only risks posed by the chemicals. Studies also hint at links with cancer, infertility, heart disease and cognitive problems.

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/0...comm_ref=false

  10. #10
    dangerous floater Winehole23's Avatar
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    merging with Syngenta?

    Combined, the two companies would form a singular agribusiness behemoth, a company that controls a third of both the globe's seed and pesticides markets.
    http://www.motherjones.com/tom-philp...ion-pesticides

  11. #11
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    Syngenta's atrazine, banned in Europe as endocrine disruptor. etc, but US BigChem/BigAg keep poisoning America and Americans with atrazine.

  12. #12
    Garnett > Duncan sickdsm's Avatar
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    Atrazine is a HUGE component of Non GMO corn herbicide programs.

    GMO, not so much since corn is a grass and rup easily kills grasses.

    Atrazine= bad stuff.

    Non-GMO = atrazine.


    Monsanto plans on selling off Syngebta seed division as part of any merger.

  13. #13
    dangerous floater Winehole23's Avatar
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    Monsanto plans on selling off Syngebta seed division as part of any merger.
    just curious, where'd you hear that?


    It is obvious that a Monsanto-Syngenta merger would not be approved without some dives ures. The primary area of concern is surely the corn and soybean seed market, the two most important field crops where Monsanto is the market leader, followed by DuPont Pioneer.

    This situation most likely calls for a complete sale of Syngenta's corn and soybean seeds business which represents more than 50% of Syngenta seed revenue. This is something Monsanto could surely get over with, as Syngenta's seed business is less profitable than its crop protection segment and ultimately only a minor earnings contributor for the group.


    Given Monsanto's small agrochemical portfolio and its focus on glyphosate, the overlap in the agrochemical segment is only limited hence regulatory requirements should be more easily met.


    Syngenta has its own glyphosate business under the brand name "Touchdown" which is part of the product line of non-selective herbicides. The non-selective herbicides (which also include the active ingredient paraquat, the "Gramoxone" product range) accounted for $1,445M of Syngenta's Crop Protection revenue in the last year. Syngenta's glyphosate sales have been declining during the past years as part of the company's strategy to step back from the margin-dilutive business. The sale of Syngenta's glyphosate business, at least in some regions, is another likely request regulators might have, but another one which a joint Monsanto-Syngenta could easily fulfill.
    http://seekingalpha.com/article/3167...ft-in-strategy

  14. #14
    Garnett > Duncan sickdsm's Avatar
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    More like where DIDN'T i hear that.

    Probably the best source's were the Monsanto seed rep's.

    Syngenta seed salesman also.

    Syngenta's getting sued, Class action that's most likely to be won. Not sure what ramifications that will have, but rumurs are its going to amount to $.25-$.75/per bushel of corn produced in '13-'14 being payed out from their seed division.


    Glyphosphate is a poor market to be in. No patents on it so the generics are cheaper and the Roundup brand's have to be sold much cheaper than what they were to compete. They offer lots of rebates but you need to stack Monsanto products to qualify. For a few years Roundup was the same price as the generics, hoping they would snuff out the compe ion.

  15. #15
    dangerous floater Winehole23's Avatar
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    I believe you, A link would be nice.

    Where did you hear this stuff? Don't hoard the knowledge.

  16. #16
    Garnett > Duncan sickdsm's Avatar
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    I believe you, A link would be nice.

    Where did you hear this stuff? Don't hoard the knowledge.
    I told you where i heard it.

    So in other words you want me to google a link where a random person writes down similar things?

    Monsanto would have to make significant concessions to get permission from authorities, such as spinning off significant parts of the combined operations – perhaps the seeds operation. In the US, the union has benefits and analysts see it as a way for Monsanto to deflect increasing resistance for its Glyphosfate, the best-selling weed killer on the planet as Syngenta has alternative solutions for this market.
    Monsanto may decide to sell Syngenta’s seed division in order to cir vent a reluctance from an rust authorities. Monsanto is expected to offer a higher bid, which should be accepted by Syngenta shareholders, even as all options remain open, including that of a hostile takeover.

    http://www.proactiveinvestors.com/co...ver-61415.html

  17. #17
    dangerous floater Winehole23's Avatar
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    thanks for the link

  18. #18
    Garnett > Duncan sickdsm's Avatar
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  19. #19
    dangerous floater Winehole23's Avatar
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    Bayer to acquire Monsanto?

    Now, however, Monsanto has emerged as the hunted party, and it is a European rival—Bayer—that is taking aim. In a Wednesday statement, Monsanto acknowledged "an unsolicited, non-binding proposal from Bayer AG for a potential acquisition of Monsanto, subject to due diligence, regulatory approvals, and other conditions." Neither company has publicly discussed a price. The Wall Street Journal puts it at "more than $42 billion" for "what could be the biggest foreign corporate takeover effort ever by a German company" and the "largest deal in Bayer's 150-year history."


    Quoting an estimate from Bernstein Research analyst Jeremy Redenius, Reuters reports that the price tag could be north of $50 billion.
    http://www.motherjones.com/environme...g-buy-monsanto

  20. #20
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    Monsanto Just Made a Massive Mistake

    One of its weedkillers seems to be wiping out valuable crops, too. Oops.




    wepix/iStock

    A couple of weeks ago, the Environmental Protection Agency announced it had gotten "unusually high number of reports of crop damage that appear related to misuse of herbicides containing the active ingredient dicamba."

    Complaints of drooping and often dead crops appeared in no fewer than 10 states, the EPA reports.

    In Missouri alone, the agency says it has gotten 117 complaints there "alleging misuse of pesticide products containing dicamba," affecting more than 42,000 acres of crops, including peaches, tomatoes, cantaloupes, watermelons, rice, peas, peanuts, alfalfa, as well as cotton and soybeans.

    The state's largest peach farm, which lies near soybean-and-cotton country, has suffered massive and potentially permanent damage this year—and suspects dicamba drift as the culprit, reports the St. Louis Post-Dispatch.


    The dicamba products currently on the market tend to vaporize in the air and drift far away from the land they're applied on, killing other crops.


    What gives?


    The trouble appears to stem from decisions made by the Missouri-based seed and pesticide giant Monsanto. Back in April, the company bet big on dicamba, announcing a $975 million expansion of its production facility in Luling, La. The chemical is the reason the company launched its new Roundup Ready Xtend soybean and cotton seeds, genetically engineered to withstand both dicamba and Monsanto's old flagship herbicide, glyphosate (brand name: Roundup).

    Within a decade, the company wrote, the new GM crops will proliferate from the US Midwest all the way to Brazil and points south, covering as much as 250 million acres of farmland (a combined land mass equal to about two and a half times the acreage of California)—and moving lots of dicamba.


    The plan is off to a rough start—which brings us back to those drooping crops in soybean and cotton country.

    The company elected to release Roundup Ready Xtend soybean and cotton seeds this spring, even though the EPA has not yet signed off on a new herbicide product that combines glyphosate and a new dicamba formulation.

    That was a momentous decision, because the dicamba products currently on the market are highly volatile—that is, they have a well-do ented tendency to vaporize in the air and drift far away from the land they're applied on, killing other crops.

    Monsanto's new dicamba, tweaked with what the company calls "VaporGrip" technology, is supposedly much less volatile.


    The trouble is that farmers have been planting glyphosate-tolerant cotton and soybeans for years, and as a result, are dealing with a mounting tide of weeds that have evolved to resist that ubiquitous weed killer. So they jumped at the new seeds, and evidently began dousing crops with old dicamba formulations as a way to knock out those glyphosate-tolerant weeds. Oops.


    For its part, Monsanto says it expects the EPA to approve the new, improved dicamba formulation in time for the 2017 growing season, and that it never expected farmers to use old dicamba formulations on the dicamba-tolerant crops it released this year.

    If the VaporGrip formulation does indeed control volatization as promised, the drift incidents of 2016 will likely soon just be a painful memory for affected farmers. If not, they portend yet more trouble ahead for the PR-challenged ag giant.


    http://www.motherjones.com/environment/2016/08/monsanto-mistake-dicamba

    Monsanto, Syngenta, BigChem sickening, poisoning, killing people, air, water, the planet, for profit.



  21. #21
    dangerous floater Winehole23's Avatar
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    Monsanto Just Made a Massive Mistake

    One of its weedkillers seems to be wiping out valuable crops, too. Oops.

    A couple of weeks ago, the Environmental Protection Agency announced it had gotten "unusually high number of reports of crop damage that appear related to misuse of herbicides containing the active ingredient dicamba."

    Complaints of drooping and often dead crops appeared in no fewer than 10 states, the EPA reports.

    In Missouri alone, the agency says it has gotten 117 complaints there "alleging misuse of pesticide products containing dicamba," affecting more than 42,000 acres of crops, including peaches, tomatoes, cantaloupes, watermelons, rice, peas, peanuts, alfalfa, as well as cotton and soybeans.

    The state's largest peach farm, which lies near soybean-and-cotton country, has suffered massive and potentially permanent damage this year—and suspects dicamba drift as the culprit, reports the St. Louis Post-Dispatch.


    The dicamba products currently on the market tend to vaporize in the air and drift far away from the land they're applied on, killing other crops.


    What gives?


    The trouble appears to stem from decisions made by the Missouri-based seed and pesticide giant Monsanto. Back in April, the company bet big on dicamba, announcing a $975 million expansion of its production facility in Luling, La. The chemical is the reason the company launched its new Roundup Ready Xtend soybean and cotton seeds, genetically engineered to withstand both dicamba and Monsanto's old flagship herbicide, glyphosate (brand name: Roundup).

    Within a decade, the company wrote, the new GM crops will proliferate from the US Midwest all the way to Brazil and points south, covering as much as 250 million acres of farmland (a combined land mass equal to about two and a half times the acreage of California)—and moving lots of dicamba.


    The plan is off to a rough start—which brings us back to those drooping crops in soybean and cotton country.

    The company elected to release Roundup Ready Xtend soybean and cotton seeds this spring, even though the EPA has not yet signed off on a new herbicide product that combines glyphosate and a new dicamba formulation.

    That was a momentous decision, because the dicamba products currently on the market are highly volatile—that is, they have a well-do ented tendency to vaporize in the air and drift far away from the land they're applied on, killing other crops.

    Monsanto's new dicamba, tweaked with what the company calls "VaporGrip" technology, is supposedly much less volatile.


    The trouble is that farmers have been planting glyphosate-tolerant cotton and soybeans for years, and as a result, are dealing with a mounting tide of weeds that have evolved to resist that ubiquitous weed killer. So they jumped at the new seeds, and evidently began dousing crops with old dicamba formulations as a way to knock out those glyphosate-tolerant weeds. Oops.


    For its part, Monsanto says it expects the EPA to approve the new, improved dicamba formulation in time for the 2017 growing season, and that it never expected farmers to use old dicamba formulations on the dicamba-tolerant crops it released this year.

    If the VaporGrip formulation does indeed control volatization as promised, the drift incidents of 2016 will likely soon just be a painful memory for affected farmers. If not, they portend yet more trouble ahead for the PR-challenged ag giant.


    http://www.motherjones.com/environment/2016/08/monsanto-mistake-dicamba

    Monsanto, Syngenta, BigChem sickening, poisoning, killing people, air, water, the planet, for profit.


    the monopolist -- Bayer -- has a proprietary seed for a plant that resists dicamba, which was created to solve the superweed problem caused by previous pesticide use.


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