Results 1 to 19 of 19
  1. #1
    ಥ﹏ಥ DAF86's Avatar
    My Team
    San Antonio Spurs
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Post Count
    42,362
    As a sports fan that tries to give every athletic game a chance, I find myself constantly tuning into baseball games only to never being able to seat through an entire encounter. The main culprit? The relievers' dance. It just makes the game lag so ing much. I know there have been some changes made to try and fix this, but I don't think they are enough, so I propose some changes to improve the pacing of the latter part of a baseball game. Please, long time fans, tell me if these are ridiculous or not.

    1) This is no-brainer for me. Stop allowing the pitchers' coaches and catchers go talk to the pitcher on the mound. If a pitcher is struggling, let him figure it out for himself. Talk to him during innings. Nobody wants to see a gathering of folks talking through a baseball glove.

    2) Another no-brainer. When a reliever comes in, don't waste time letting him warm up on the mound. All the warm up he needs should happen in the bullpen. As soon as a guy comes into the game he should start pitching right away. Maybe 2 or 3 warmup pitches, but that's it.

    3) Now, onto some more controversial ideas. A reliever should pitch, at least, an entire inning (or get hooked after conceding 3 guys to get on base). It gets boring as when the game gets constantly interrumped by pitchers' changes every other batter.

    4) a "pitch-clock" to speed up the game.

  2. #2
    Veteran Proxy's Avatar
    My Team
    San Antonio Spurs
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Post Count
    3,747
    let them all take steroids

  3. #3
    TheDrewShow is salty lefty's Avatar
    My Team
    San Antonio Spurs
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Post Count
    97,325

  4. #4
    Veteran playblair's Avatar
    My Team
    Milwaukee Bucks
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Post Count
    4,464
    7 innings..........shorter field..........pitch clock...........

  5. #5
    6X ST MVP
    My Team
    San Antonio Spurs
    Join Date
    Jul 2015
    Post Count
    81,093
    One,two and four are feasible IMO. Number three you're going to run into too many issues and too many malcontents even long after its implemented IMO.

  6. #6
    Veteran
    My Team
    San Antonio Spurs
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Post Count
    43,237
    Baseball has turned into babying the pitchers so none of that will happen. They're now going the extra step to limit pitchers to 4-5 innings per outing so that's why you're seeing 3-4 pitcher changes per games no matter the circustance.

  7. #7
    Klaw apalisoc_9's Avatar
    My Team
    San Antonio Spurs
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Post Count
    24,485
    As a sports fan that tries to give every athletic game a chance, I find myself constantly tuning into baseball games only to never being able to seat through an entire encounter. The main culprit? The relievers' dance. It just makes the game lag so ing much. I know there have been some changes made to try and fix this, but I don't think they are enough, so I propose some changes to improve the pacing of the latter part of a baseball game. Please, long time fans, tell me if these are ridiculous or not.

    1) This is no-brainer for me. Stop allowing the pitchers' coaches and catchers go talk to the pitcher on the mound. If a pitcher is struggling, let him figure it out for himself. Talk to him during innings. Nobody wants to see a gathering of folks talking through a baseball glove.

    2) Another no-brainer. When a reliever comes in, don't waste time letting him warm up on the mound. All the warm up he needs should happen in the bullpen. As soon as a guy comes into the game he should start pitching right away. Maybe 2 or 3 warmup pitches, but that's it.

    3) Now, onto some more controversial ideas. A reliever should pitch, at least, an entire inning (or get hooked after conceding 3 guys to get on base). It gets boring as when the game gets constantly interrumped by pitchers' changes every other batter.

    4) a "pitch-clock" to speed up the game.
    I think in line with Ohtani becoming a sensation, they also need to find ways to make the players that appeal to casuals play more. The fact that ohtani has to sit or resort to pinch hitter in NL games he is not pitching is unacceptable.

    Walks continue to be defended by more seasoned fans because it is a “strategy” but if I have the TV on and I see Vlad at bat and they intentionally walk him..I’m closing the TV. You need casuals and you have the chance to convert them to fans, but it’s hard when these rules exist.

    Maybe do something llke. The second intentional walk against player results in a scored run for the batter...third walk against the same player, it’s a two base run just to avoid manipulations long that rule

  8. #8
    SeaGOAT midnightpulp's Avatar
    My Team
    San Antonio Spurs
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Post Count
    26,970
    As a sports fan that tries to give every athletic game a chance, I find myself constantly tuning into baseball games only to never being able to seat through an entire encounter. The main culprit? The relievers' dance. It just makes the game lag so ing much. I know there have been some changes made to try and fix this, but I don't think they are enough, so I propose some changes to improve the pacing of the latter part of a baseball game. Please, long time fans, tell me if these are ridiculous or not.

    1) This is no-brainer for me. Stop allowing the pitchers' coaches and catchers go talk to the pitcher on the mound. If a pitcher is struggling, let him figure it out for himself. Talk to him during innings. Nobody wants to see a gathering of folks talking through a baseball glove.

    2) Another no-brainer. When a reliever comes in, don't waste time letting him warm up on the mound. All the warm up he needs should happen in the bullpen. As soon as a guy comes into the game he should start pitching right away. Maybe 2 or 3 warmup pitches, but that's it.

    3) Now, onto some more controversial ideas. A reliever should pitch, at least, an entire inning (or get hooked after conceding 3 guys to get on base). It gets boring as when the game gets constantly interrumped by pitchers' changes every other batter.

    4) a "pitch-clock" to speed up the game.
    None of your suggestions are actually "ridiculous."

    Many sports fans who've only watched the modern game think baseball was always played like this. The modern game is as far away from traditional baseball as you can get. In the "good old days," pitchers were expected to go nine-innings, and would only be subbed if they were getting s ed. Pitchers didn't take 30 seconds between pitches. Batters didn't step out of the box after every pitch. Strikeouts weren't the de facto outcome of most at bats. Average length of game in the 70s? About 2ish hours.

    Many of your suggestions are actually being considered or have been implemented at the minor leagues. In addition to that, the MLB is experimenting with moving the mound back to reduce strikeouts to get more balls in play. Primary issue is, like all corporations, the MLB is slow to enact changes due to internal bureaucracy and general complacency. The pitch clock should've been implemented three years ago. The electronic strikezone should've been implemented already.

  9. #9
    notthewordsofonewhokneels Thread's Avatar
    My Team
    Los Angeles Lakers
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Post Count
    70,381
    No reliever games. It's humiliating.
    No setting a player at second base in extra innings. It's humiliating.
    No 7 inning games in a double header. It's humiliating.
    No framing pitches. It's a disgrace.

  10. #10
    Believe. MultiTroll's Avatar
    My Team
    San Antonio Spurs
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Post Count
    16,996
    Electronic balls and strikes. End this b.s.
    Including reviews of check swing.


    Corrupt MLB at a snails pace is *working on it*.

    Low-A (both leagues): Cap on pick-off attempts
    The rule change: Pitchers will be limited to a total of two pick-off attempts or step-offs per plate appearance. If a third attempt is made, it's a balk as long as the runner makers it back to the base safely. MLB is also considering lower the cap to just one attempt.
    What MLB wants to see: Similar to the change directly above, MLB wants more stolen bases. The dance between pitchers and runners will suddenly have a cap imposed, which figures to increase activity on the basepaths. The decline of the stolen base has been lamented for years, and MLB is trying out three different rules to reverse that.


    Low-A (Southeast): Robot umps
    The rule change: An automatic ball-strike system will be tested in select games to assist home plate umpires.
    What MLB wants to see: The league has been playing around with this for years in the Atlantic League and Arizona Fall League, and it almost feels like the league is just ironing out the kinks before ins uting robot umps at this point. It's unclear if umpires will be required to relay the strike call or will only receive them as a strong suggestion. Either way, there's a good chance Angel Hernandez won't be able to hurt you anymore.

    Low-A (West): Pitch clock
    The rule change: New regulations will be added to the pitch clocks to enforce time limits on delivery of pitches, inning breaks and pitching changes.
    What MLB wants to see: MLB has already used pitch clocks in spring training, Triple-A, Double-A, High-A and the Arizona Fall League going back to 2014, so this is an expansion of another change that feels inevitable at this point. It infuriates pitchers, but that's the sacrifice Manfred is willing to make to improve pace of play.

  11. #11
    coffee's for closers FrostKing's Avatar
    My Team
    Chicago Bulls
    Join Date
    Aug 2018
    Post Count
    12,886

  12. #12
    Believe. MultiTroll's Avatar
    My Team
    San Antonio Spurs
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Post Count
    16,996
    ^

  13. #13
    notthewordsofonewhokneels Thread's Avatar
    My Team
    Los Angeles Lakers
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Post Count
    70,381
    Electronic balls and strikes. End this b.s.
    Including reviews of check swing.


    Corrupt MLB at a snails pace is *working on it*.


    Low-A (both leagues): Cap on pick-off attempts
    The rule change: Pitchers will be limited to a total of two pick-off attempts or step-offs per plate appearance. If a third attempt is made, it's a balk as long as the runner makers it back to the base safely. MLB is also considering lower the cap to just one attempt.
    What MLB wants to see: Similar to the change directly above, MLB wants more stolen bases. The dance between pitchers and runners will suddenly have a cap imposed, which figures to increase activity on the basepaths. The decline of the stolen base has been lamented for years, and MLB is trying out three different rules to reverse that.


    Low-A (Southeast): Robot umps
    The rule change: An automatic ball-strike system will be tested in select games to assist home plate umpires.
    What MLB wants to see: The league has been playing around with this for years in the Atlantic League and Arizona Fall League, and it almost feels like the league is just ironing out the kinks before ins uting robot umps at this point. It's unclear if umpires will be required to relay the strike call or will only receive them as a strong suggestion. Either way, there's a good chance Angel Hernandez won't be able to hurt you anymore.

    Low-A (West): Pitch clock
    The rule change: New regulations will be added to the pitch clocks to enforce time limits on delivery of pitches, inning breaks and pitching changes.
    What MLB wants to see: MLB has already used pitch clocks in spring training, Triple-A, Double-A, High-A and the Arizona Fall League going back to 2014, so this is an expansion of another change that feels inevitable at this point. It infuriates pitchers, but that's the sacrifice Manfred is willing to make to improve pace of play.
    Mult

  14. #14
    Manu Mania lefty20's Avatar
    My Team
    San Antonio Spurs
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Post Count
    2,889
    As a some who grew up playing/watching Cricket, I don't see why outfielders needs to attach a basket on their hands to catch fly balls. Get rid of outfielder gloves and the game will be much, much more entertaining.

  15. #15
    SeaGOAT midnightpulp's Avatar
    My Team
    San Antonio Spurs
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Post Count
    26,970
    As a some who grew up playing/watching Cricket, I don't see why outfielders needs to attach a basket on their hands to catch fly balls. Get rid of outfielder gloves and the game will be much, much more entertaining.
    This would honestly ruin the sport. As you know from playing Cricket, the catch success rate on fly balls/liners is much, much lower than in baseball because of gloves. As it stands, outfielders catch the ball at about a 98% success rate. Sans gloves, I would expect that percentage to drop to around 70 percent. This would translate into even MORE launch angle/trying to get the ball into the air because there's a good chance the fielder will misplay the fly ball. I also don't think a baseball player's hands would hold up over a season. The ball is hit much harder in baseball than it is in cricket, and baseball outfielders catch a lot more balls than cricket players. The all-time catch leader in Cricket is Dravid at 406 over his his 16 year career in all formats. A centerfielder makes that many catches in a season. I think the repeated abuse would eventually cause too many injuries.

    Baseball just need to implement some tweaks to incentivize the groundball again. Whether that's through banning/limiting the shift or widening fair territory (that will never happen, but if I was the dictator of the MLB, that's the change I would implement). That said, I wouldn't be opposed to smaller gloves for outfielders, so we get some more misplayed balls and thus more action, but again, we can't making catching a ball too difficult because what we're ultimately looking for is a balanced approach between fly balls and groundballs.

  16. #16
    SeaGOAT midnightpulp's Avatar
    My Team
    San Antonio Spurs
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Post Count
    26,970
    Furthermore, modern baseball isn't some enigma in which fixes that could improve the modern game are impossible to implement.

    - Pitch clock
    - No warm up pitches for the reliever on the mound. Subbing in a relief pitcher should be as seamless as subbing in a basketball player.
    - Tweaks to incentivize more small ball and stolen base attempts.
    - Tweaks to cut the strikeout rate down to about 5 per 9 innings vs. the current mark of 10 per 9 innings.
    - Electronic strikezone.

    The MLB actually knows how to do all of these things, but refuses to enact change because they're yet another soulless corporation who puts short term profit over long term health. That said, I find MLB baseball much more tolerable than NBA basketball or NFL football. As I've said countless times before, basketball is a fundamentally broken sport. Baseball isn't broken per game design like basketball, it simply shouldn't take three-and-a-half-hours to play a 2-1 game and most fans prefer hits and balls in play over constant strikeouts.

  17. #17
    Manu Mania lefty20's Avatar
    My Team
    San Antonio Spurs
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Post Count
    2,889
    This would honestly ruin the sport. As you know from playing Cricket, the catch success rate on fly balls/liners is much, much lower than in baseball because of gloves. As it stands, outfielders catch the ball at about a 98% success rate. Sans gloves, I would expect that percentage to drop to around 70 percent. This would translate into even MORE launch angle/trying to get the ball into the air because there's a good chance the fielder will misplay the fly ball. I also don't think a baseball player's hands would hold up over a season. The ball is hit much harder in baseball than it is in cricket, and baseball outfielders catch a lot more balls than cricket players. The all-time catch leader in Cricket is Dravid at 406 over his his 16 year career in all formats. A centerfielder makes that many catches in a season. I think the repeated abuse would eventually cause too many injuries.

    Baseball just need to implement some tweaks to incentivize the groundball again. Whether that's through banning/limiting the shift or widening fair territory (that will never happen, but if I was the dictator of the MLB, that's the change I would implement). That said, I wouldn't be opposed to smaller gloves for outfielders, so we get some more misplayed balls and thus more action, but again, we can't making catching a ball too difficult because what we're ultimately looking for is a balanced approach between fly balls and groundballs.
    Yeah you're right, it'd prolly up the game over the long haul.

    How about no outfield gloves in the all-star game then? It'd definitely get me to tune in. I think the last time I saw an all-star game was in 2016 and only because our entire in-field was starting.

  18. #18
    SeaGOAT midnightpulp's Avatar
    My Team
    San Antonio Spurs
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Post Count
    26,970
    Yeah you're right, it'd prolly up the game over the long haul.

    How about no outfield gloves in the all-star game then? It'd definitely get me to tune in. I think the last time I saw an all-star game was in 2016 and only because our entire in-field was starting.
    I think the core issue with baseball right now is they've never changed the field dimensions as the athletes have evolved. I actually think 90 feet between basepaths is "perfect," but 1900s baseball didn't have pitchers like Jacob Degrom and athletes like Tatis and Trout roaming the infield and outfield. The range of modern fielders is just ridiculous. My simple fix is something like this:



    We keep the distances between basepaths the same, but extend fair territory. Hitters will have many more infield gaps to targets with groundballs and such. And as a bonus, we get to enjoy all the uber-athlete middle-infielders testing out their range and arms.

    And 60'6" is becoming too short of a distance for modern pitching.

  19. #19
    Manu Mania lefty20's Avatar
    My Team
    San Antonio Spurs
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Post Count
    2,889
    I think the core issue with baseball right now is they've never changed the field dimensions as the athletes have evolved. I actually think 90 feet between basepaths is "perfect," but 1900s baseball didn't have pitchers like Jacob Degrom and athletes like Tatis and Trout roaming the infield and outfield. The range of modern fielders is just ridiculous. My simple fix is something like this:



    We keep the distances between basepaths the same, but extend fair territory. Hitters will have many more infield gaps to targets with groundballs and such. And as a bonus, we get to enjoy all the uber-athlete middle-infielders testing out their range and arms.

    And 60'6" is becoming too short of a distance for modern pitching.
    I think there are problems with expanding the field of play/fair territory in old parks like Wrigley and Fenway. I'm sure there are other parks as well that have little to no foul territory down the sides past 1/3rd base.

    Additionally, wouldn't moving the mound back just encourage hitters to keep swing bigger and higher? Since they'd have even more time before ball gets into the hitting zone.

    How about raising the mound and moving it back a little?

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •