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  1. #1
    dangerous floater Winehole23's Avatar
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    Samsung is set to build a new $17 billion computer chip factory in Taylor, Texas, The Wall Street Journal reported.


    An official announcement could come as early as Tuesday, people familiar with the matter told the Journal, and comes as the Biden administration makes a push for expanding semiconductor production in the U.S.


    Spokespeople for Samsung and Texas Gov. Greg Abbott (R), who is scheduled to make an economic announcement later Tuesday, did not immediately respond to requests for comment.
    https://thehill.com/policy/technolog...factory-report

  2. #2
    i am inevitable Thanos's Avatar
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    Great, now the lines at Louie Mueller’s are going to be even crazier.

  3. #3
    dangerous floater Winehole23's Avatar
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    Great, now the lines at Louie Mueller’s are going to be even crazier.
    Great cue, did you ever try the brisket at Taylor Cafe before it closed?

  4. #4
    生麦生米生ハメ baseline bum's Avatar
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    Great, now the lines at Louie Mueller’s are going to be even crazier.
    Great cue, did you ever try the brisket at Taylor Cafe before it closed?
    Never been. Anything I can get better at Louie Mueller than at City Market, Black's, or Smitty's?

  5. #5
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    So what's that make, 10 Fabs under construction in the US now?

  6. #6
    dangerous floater Winehole23's Avatar
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    Never been. Anything I can get better at Louie Mueller than at City Market, Black's, or Smitty's?
    Other than the beef rib I'd say no, but it's been a few years since I've been to LM.

    City Market is pretty much my go to for out of town cue.

  7. #7
    dangerous floater Winehole23's Avatar
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    So what's that make, 10 Fabs under construction in the US now?
    what are the others?

  8. #8
    Alleged Michigander ChumpDumper's Avatar
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    Interesting reverse commuting scheme.

  9. #9
    i am inevitable Thanos's Avatar
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    Never been. Anything I can get better at Louie Mueller than at City Market, Black's, or Smitty's?
    It’s been a couple years since I last went, but I think they have the best beef ribs in Texas.

  10. #10
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    what are the others?
    I don't know them all, just heard 9 were planned not too long ago. I know intel is building a couple and I think I heard TSMC & Texas Instruments as well.

    It's not just the US, the capitalist world appears done with exploiting China.

  11. #11
    my unders, my frgn whites pgardn's Avatar
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    Abbott and his globalization schemes. Oh yes, business friendly.

    Why is the real red team putting up with this large scale cooperation?
    This is communism and globalization. Where are the US owned companies? wtf, a tax break for commies? (south koreans have that narrow eyed commie look)

    -koriwhat

  12. #12
    生麦生米生ハメ baseline bum's Avatar
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    I don't know them all, just heard 9 were planned not too long ago. I know intel is building a couple and I think I heard TSMC & Texas Instruments as well.

    It's not just the US, the capitalist world appears done with exploiting China.
    Don't think Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Company ever had much use for China tbh

  13. #13
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    Don't think Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Company ever had much use for China tbh
    Oh okay

  14. #14
    dangerous floater Winehole23's Avatar
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    I don't know them all, just heard 9 were planned not too long ago. I know intel is building a couple and I think I heard TSMC & Texas Instruments as well.

    It's not just the US, the capitalist world appears done with exploiting China.
    ah, yes your pet theory that China is imploding as we speak. what's your timeline on that?

  15. #15
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    ah, yes your pet theory that China is imploding as we speak. what's your timeline on that?
    Imploding is your word. We've already seen peak China.

  16. #16
    dangerous floater Winehole23's Avatar
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    Imploding is your word. We've already seen peak China.
    What makes you think so?

  17. #17
    dangerous floater Winehole23's Avatar
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    Imploding is your word. We've already seen peak China.
    My bad, it was the EU you said was on the verge of collapse, because you read one book.


    https://www.spurstalk.com/forums/sho...1#post10455644
    https://www.amazon.com/Disunited-Nat.../dp/0062913689

  18. #18
    Mr. John Wayne CosmicCowboy's Avatar
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    China will continue to kick our ass. Here is an interesting oped from the wall street journal. I will clip and paste since you have to have a subscription to read it.

    As a Chinese doctoral student raising a young son in the U.S., I am mystified by how American elementary schools coddle students. In China, schools are run like boot camps. What do the therapeutic comforts America showers on its youth portend for a growing compe ion with China?

    I recently registered my son in the third grade at a New Jersey public school. Hattie had recently finished two years of elementary school in Chengdu, China, where he trotted off to school each day with a backpack stuffed with thick textbooks and materials for practices and quizzes. Here he leaves for school with little in his backpack other than a required “healthy snack.”

    The first day he came home with a sheet of math homework: 35 addition problems. He finished in about a minute. On the second day, he was asked to write 328 in different configurations. He first wrote down 300+20+8, following the prompt, and then 164x2, 82x4 and 6562.

    My son is not a genius, but he started studying math at an early age. When he was 5, I taught him fractions. Two years later, I introduced him to algebra. It is a core belief in Chinese society that talent can be trained, so schools should be tough on children. Chinese students score at the top of international math and science tests.

    This is not a philosophy shared by American schools. On Friday night my son came home announcing in bewilderment that he didn’t have any homework. In China students tend to receive twice as much homework on the weekend, given the two days to complete it. How will America compete with a China determined to train the best mathematicians, scientists and engineers?

    Unfolding now are two Maoist cultural revolutions, one in the East and the other in the West. The former is a jingoistic nationalism enforced by party loyalties and ubiquitous secret police. The latter is an anti-Americanism enforced by progressive mobs seeking to defund the police. Both are about limiting expression, controlling thought and regulating behavior.

    Xi Jinping has been cracking down on everything from finance to entertainment to whip his country through a “national rejuvenation.” China’s nationalism is explicitly anchored in Maoism, with Mr. Xi representing the new cult of personality. Meanwhile, woke America—which, consciously or not, deploys Maoist tactics—is destroying the core traditions of Western civilization with iden y politics.

    In both countries, control must extend to the very young to mold them in the image of the official ideology. In fall 2021 Chinese pupils returned to school with a new requirement to study “Xi Jinping Thought.” Schools must “plant the seeds of loving the party, the country, and socialism in young hearts,” a government announcement declares. Across the ocean, American pupils are taught that white America is inherently racist, regardless of individual intention or action.

    Chinese education pushes the young in directions that serve the party and the state. Youth are trained to be skilled laborers ready to endure hard work and brutal compe ion. Such political indoctrination is taught side by side with math and science. American education is supposed to be about opening minds but appears not to fill them with much. Worse, young Americans are not prepared for the demands of being an adult.

    This phenomenon started in higher education. For years attending American universities, I have been disturbed to watch colleges fabricate “anxiety” and “depression” in students who are not mentally ill. Administrators have used grossly exaggerated terms such as “trauma,” and melodramatic expressions such as “I cannot begin to imagine what you have suffered,” to turn into a catastrophe what is best described as disappointment. This creates a culture of victimization.

    The absurdity peaked after the election of Donald Trump in 2016. Students from elite universities claimed existential despair, finding comfort in cocoa, coloring books and therapy dogs. Classes were canceled and exams postponed, all in the name of soothing 20-somethings who need to be learning how to adapt to reality as adults.

    Chinese citizens enjoy mocking the Western “snowflakes.” Less amusing is what this trend means for the U.S. as China no longer hides its enmity for America.

  19. #19
    Mr. John Wayne CosmicCowboy's Avatar
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    double post

  20. #20
    Alleged Michigander ChumpDumper's Avatar
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    Who names their son Hattie?

  21. #21
    🏆🏆🏆🏆🏆 ElNono's Avatar
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    Brandon bringing back manufacturing, building back better, etc...

    Brandon

  22. #22
    🏆🏆🏆🏆🏆 ElNono's Avatar
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    Intel also laid out pretty significant plans for chip fabs in Arizona...

    Intel's Expensive New Plan to Upgrade Its Chip Technology - and US Manufacturing

    America's push to manufacturer more products domestically gets an in-depth look from CNET including a new Intel chip factory outside of Phoenix.

    CNET calls it a fork in the road "after squandering its lead because of a half decade of problems modernizing its manufacturing..." With "a decade of bad decisions, this doesn't get fixed overnight," says Pat Gelsinger, Intel's new chief executive, in an interview. "But the bottom is behind us and the slope is starting to feel increasingly strong...." More fabs are on the way, too. In an enormous empty patch of dirt at its existing Arizona site, Intel has just begun building fabs 52 and 62 at a total cost of $20 billion, set to make Intel's most advanced chips, starting in 2024. Later this year, it hopes to announce the U.S. location for its third major manufacturing complex, a 1,000-acre site costing about $100 billion. The spending commitment makes this year's $3.5 billion upgrade to its New Mexico fab look cheap. The goal is to restore the U.S. share of chip manufacturing, which has slid from 37% in 1990 to 12% today. "Over the decade in front of us, we should be striving to bring the U.S. to 30% of worldwide semiconductor manufacturing," Gelsinger says...

    But returning Intel to its glory days and anchoring a resurgent U.S. electronics business in the process is much easier said than done. Making chips profitably means running fabs at maximum capacity to pay off the gargantuan investments required to stay at the leading edge. A company that can't keep pace gets squeezed out, like IBM in 2014 or Global Foundries in 2018. To catch up after its delays, Intel now plans to upgrade its manufacturing five times in the next four years, a breakneck pace by industry standards. "This new roadmap that they announced is really aggressive," says Linley Group analyst Linley Gwennap. "I don't have any idea how they are going to accomplish all of that...."

    Gelsinger has a tech-first recovery plan. He's pledged to accelerate manufacturing upgrades to match the technology of TSMC and Samsung by 2024 and surpass them in 2025. He's opening Intel's fabs to other companies that need chips built through its new Intel Foundry Services (IFS). And he's relying on other foundries, including TSMC, for about a quarter of Intel's near-term chipmaking needs to keep its chips more compe ive during the upgrades. This three-pronged strategy is called IDM (integrated design and manufacturing) 2.0. That's a new take on Intel's philosophy of both designing and making chips. It's more ambitious than the future some had expected, in which Intel would sell its factories and join the ranks of "fabless" chip designers like Nvidia, AMD and Qualcomm that rely on others for manufacturing...

    Shareholders may not like Gelsinger's spending-heavy strategy, but one community really does: Intel's engineers... Gelsigner told the board that Intel is done with stock buybacks, a financial move in which a company uses its cash to buy stock and thereby increase its price. "We're investing in factories," he told me. "That's going to be the use of our cash...."

    "We cannot recall the last time Intel put so many stakes in the ground," said BMO Capital Markets analyst Ambrish Srivastava in a July research report after Intel announced its schedule.
    Intel will even outpace Moore's law, Gelsinger tells CNET more than doubling the transistor count on processors every two years. "I believe that you're going to see from 2025 to 2035 a very healthy period for Moore's Law-like behavior."

    Although that still brings some risk to Intel's investments if they have to pass the costs on to customer, a Linley Group analyst points out to CNET. "Moore's Law is not going to end when we can't build smaller transistors. It's going to end when somebody says I don't want to pay for smaller transistors."

  23. #23
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    What makes you think so?
    Chinese labor can only get exploited once. Peak exploitation is over and the CCP failed to make any meaningful friends. Cracking down on their own population isn't the sign of strength CC thinks it is.

  24. #24
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    Brandon bringing back manufacturing, building back better, etc...

    Brandon


    I'm pleased he's sticking with Murica 1st. Hopefully it continues.

  25. #25
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    Who names their son Hattie?
    You read that entire article and all you do is mock the name of his son? Nothing about the substance of the article?

    Pretty much echoes my thoughts on US education. I hope the elections in VA spur a change in education: school choice, a return to the basics and parental involvement in their kids' education - hold these so called education expects accountable - prepare yourself for terrible test scores and school grades due to massive losses during covid. Gone are the waivers for testing for promotion - this year's testing will show the losses.

    Please supplement on your own - especially math - a shout out for my favorite curriculum - Singapore Math - the Singaporean 4th and 8th graders consistently score at the top of all countries in math and science. I used Primary Math 1-5 for all my kids (then switched to Dolciani's Pre-Algebra and Algebra in 6th and 7th).

    https://timss2019.org/reports/

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