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  1. #26
    Enemy of the System Millennial_Messiah's Avatar
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    Just asking
    Subway in earthquake zone a good idea?
    Or do you mean above ground transit?
    That, and most of California has the same problem Texas has with poor foundations and limestone. Not enough dirt to carve out until you get farther inland where it's dullsville.

  2. #27
    Enemy of the System Millennial_Messiah's Avatar
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    Andrew
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    If you can't build basements, you can't build subways; and California's problem is amplified because of the earthquakes/faultlines.

    Japan's subway system is definitely in jeopardy. Imagine going 70MPH on a subway and all of a sudden a 9.1 magnitude strikes, that would be a horrible way to die. People died in the 2011 Honshu quake, and couldn't imagine what the catastrophe would be like if the epicenter would be anywhere near, say, Tokyo. (Or LA/SF).

  3. #28
    Enemy of the System Millennial_Messiah's Avatar
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    Funny, because I actually tried to view the Capitol from 35 and no dice..........
    You have to be on the right side of the divide going southbound and on the left side going northbound to see it. The best view is at night from the right side of the divide going southbound towards SA. The GPS will want to take you on the left side of the divide but the right side is worth it especially at night in light traffic due to the stunning view of downtown. And yes definitely you can still see the Capitol.

  4. #29
    Believe.
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    90 mph on 405 wtf now I know you're trolling me unless you're talking about going that speed north of the pass. I have a really hard time believing you ever lived in LA with comments like that.
    Dude EVERYBODY drives waaaay over the speed limit in L.A. - I mean if you are the guy in the fast lane doing 60/70 - even 85 -

    people behind you got pissed

    todays cars - you kidding me - 95 all day long especially late at night and the best thing is that there are so many cars - you would have to be extremely unlucky to get pulled over -

    - in 20 years - in cars and/or motorcycles - I cannot even remember being pulled over once!

    If you have driven on the 405 you know as you head into the SF valley and go over the mountain past that famous musuem (Getty?) then as you go over the mountain - and start heading downhill?

    Heck everyone hit 90-95 easy as you got down and past ventura blvd into the valley heading north - everyone was going high speeds...

  5. #30
    Take the fcking keys away baseline bum's Avatar
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    Dude EVERYBODY drives waaaay over the speed limit in L.A. - I mean if you are the guy in the fast lane doing 60/70 - even 85 -

    people behind you got pissed

    todays cars - you kidding me - 95 all day long especially late at night and the best thing is that there are so many cars - you would have to be extremely unlucky to get pulled over -

    - in 20 years - in cars and/or motorcycles - I cannot even remember being pulled over once!

    If you have driven on the 405 you know as you head into the SF valley and go over the mountain past that famous musuem (Getty?) then as you go over the mountain - and start heading downhill?

    Heck everyone hit 90-95 easy as you got down and past ventura blvd into the valley heading north - everyone was going high speeds...
    That's just not what my experience on 405 was unless you're driving off peak times. My experience was more like my friend asks if I want to go to an Angels game so I leave at 4:30 for a 7:30 start and we don't even get into the stadium in Anaheim until the second inning thanks to the 405 moving at like 3mph from Wilshire to the 105. The 405 on good days would be like 35 mph for the most part if it wasn't too near rush hour where I lived. If it was rush hour whole different ballgame.

  6. #31
    Enemy of the System Millennial_Messiah's Avatar
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    Andrew
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    That's just not what my experience on 405 was unless you're driving off peak times. My experience was more like my friend asks if I want to go to an Angels game so I leave at 4:30 for a 7:30 start and we don't even get into the stadium in Anaheim until the second inning thanks to the 405 moving at like 3mph from Wilshire to the 105. The 405 on good days would be like 35 mph for the most part if it wasn't too near rush hour where I lived. If it was rush hour whole different ballgame.
    Easy fix is go to Anaheim for lunch or book a hotel there the night before so you're already there.

  7. #32
    Believe.
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    That's just not what my experience on 405 was unless you're driving off peak times. My experience was more like my friend asks if I want to go to an Angels game so I leave at 4:30 for a 7:30 start and we don't even get into the stadium in Anaheim until the second inning thanks to the 405 moving at like 3mph from Wilshire to the 105. The 405 on good days would be like 35 mph for the most part if it wasn't too near rush hour where I lived. If it was rush hour whole different ballgame.
    yeah the post after yours beat me to it

    it was all about planning too

    i wouldnt drive all the way to orange county for a game AFTER work or a couple of hours before gametime
    but i get your point that was a brutal drive

    i usually hung out in hollywood or go over the hill into the valley for dinner/sushi or whatever


    if i had any business in orange co id go early and have lunch near huntington bch or pair my trip with something else nearby and then i had easy traffic early morning (since most traffic was heading INTO l.a.)

    than after the game - easy traffic once the stadium emptied and the freeways were clear and fast

    same logic near hollywood on weekend nights…sunset/hollywood blvds were gridlocked with weekend partiers, but id use fountain and other side roads to get around faster and avoid gridlock

    in san francisco it was always taxicabs (years before ubers and such) as everything was within a 7 mile “island” that is san francisco but use my car for outings into marin co or napa or north of sf outings

    but there again, when needed to get somewhere - as long as you planned better - you could avoid most traffic by planning drives on off peak hours

  8. #33
    Enemy of the System Millennial_Messiah's Avatar
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    San Francisco is almost as bad as NYC for driving.

  9. #34
    My Favorite Faded Fantasy The Gemini Method's Avatar
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    That's just not what my experience on 405 was unless you're driving off peak times. My experience was more like my friend asks if I want to go to an Angels game so I leave at 4:30 for a 7:30 start and we don't even get into the stadium in Anaheim until the second inning thanks to the 405 moving at like 3mph from Wilshire to the 105. The 405 on good days would be like 35 mph for the most part if it wasn't too near rush hour where I lived. If it was rush hour whole different ballgame.
    Those days are brutal for sure. Seeing the 405 brisk or even open is an oddity when you're driving 6-8am and 3-6pm. I remember when the pandemic first hit and people stayed home feeling so odd when I got on the 405 and it took me 1/4 the time to go from Long Beach to Santa Monica with the majority of the time on the 405.

  10. #35
    Believe.
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    Those days are brutal for sure. Seeing the 405 brisk or even open is an oddity when you're driving 6-8am and 3-6pm. I remember when the pandemic first hit and people stayed home feeling so odd when I got on the 405 and it took me 1/4 the time to go from Long Beach to Santa Monica with the majority of the time on the 405.
    everywhere in l.a.

    it takes “twenty minutes”

    to get there!

    or so they say lol

  11. #36
    My Favorite Faded Fantasy The Gemini Method's Avatar
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    everywhere in l.a.

    it takes “twenty minutes”

    to get there!

    If you do get somewhere in 20 min, it's a miracle. It's possible, but not likely, though we tend to fabricate the amount of time it does take to at least assuage the other party that we are indeed are coming. If I'm not committed to going, I'll say "I'll be there" or hedge my arrival time.

    or so they say lol

  12. #37
    Machacarredes Chinook's Avatar
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    Austin will likely never be dense enough for subways. But they need to focus on regional rail systems to make it feasible to get into downtown without having to drive or take a slow bus. Instead, they're focusing on a new line that goes between 38th and SoCo and that doesn't even get out to the airport. It seems designed to benefit the rich folks already living in the center, who are the the ones currently suffering the least from the traffic (and contributing the most to the housing crisis). I bet it's way more expensive to build per mile than the regional rail system is, and they don't even seem to be planning for folks who want to try this ty rail system driving in from the outskirts to the termini of the line to try to use it for the last bit of the journey.

    Then in terms of roads TXDOT is expanding 35 in a way that seems like it could be a nightmare. Austin badly needs to create a way for through-traffic to bypass the main highway. In the south they're building an upper deck, but downtown they're planning on eminent domaining some historical land to widen 35 to 20 lanes. I think the concept of "induced demand" is poorly understood by folks critical of car culture, but unless these extra lanes are extremely well designed, it's going to be a cluster .

    So yeah, the path to fixing Austin's traffic is pretty clear: 1) Build a loop around the city for through-traffic to use as a bypass. 2) Build a rail network to bring people in the extremities of the city and the surrounding suburbs into the city center. 3) Create a compact trolley/bus/streetcar system for people to travel around the city center. Yes, increasing density needs to happen. But that's something that's going to require more than a magic wand. In that same way, continuing to normalize telework wherever possible would alleviate some pressure. But for me the main issue is that despite being the lowest in priority, the city is focusing on moving about the city city center and scrapping the more straight-forward options in an effort to continue to court rich people looking to move, tourists and celebrities rather than trying to make life better and more affordable for the folks who are already here. The thing they can't control is that the state government is obsessed with trying to maintain the car/fossil fuel culture wiser planners are trying to get away from, and they continue to frustrate many more progressive measures the city tries to take. They are the ones who decide which highways go where, and they don't particularly care about finding a better solution to Austin's traffic than trying to make them Katy 2.0.
    Last edited by Chinook; 06-06-2023 at 08:25 PM.

  13. #38
    I cannot grok its fullnes leemajors's Avatar
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    Austin will likely never be dense enough for subways. But they need to focus on regional rail systems to make it feasible to get into downtown without having to drive or take a slow bus. Instead, they're focusing on a new line that goes between 38th and SoCo and that doesn't even get out to the airport. It seems designed to benefit the rich folks already living in the center, who are the the ones currently suffering the most from the traffic. I bet it's way more expensive to build per mile than the regional rail system is, and they don't even seem to be planning for folks who want to try this ty rail system driving in from the outskirts to the termini of the line to try to use it for the last bit of the journey.

    Then in terms of roads TXDOT is expanding 35 in a way that seems like it could be a nightmare. Austin badly needs to create a way for through-traffic to bypass the main highway. In the south they're building an upper deck, but downtown they're planning on eminent domaining some historical land to widen 35 to 20 lanes. I think the concept of "induced demand" is poorly understood by folks critical of car culture, but unless these extra lanes are extremely well designed, it's going to be a cluster .

    So yeah, the path to fixing Austin's traffic is pretty clear: 1) Build a loop around the city for through-traffic to use as a bypass. 2) Build a rail network to bring people in the extremities of the city and the surrounding suburbs into the city center. 3) Create a compact trolley/bus/streetcar system for people to travel around the city center. Yes, increasing density needs to happen. But that's something that's going to require more than a magic wand. In that same way, continuing to normalize telework wherever possible would alleviate some pressure. But for me the main issue is that despite being the lowest in priority, the city is focusing on moving about the city city center and scrapping the more straight-forward options in an effort to continue to court rich people looking to move, tourists and celebrities rather than trying to make life better and more affordable for the folks who are already here. The thing they can't control is that the state government is obsessed with trying to maintain the car/fossil fuel culture wiser planners are trying to get away from, and they continue to frustrate many more progressive measures the city tries to take. They are the ones who decide which highways go where, and they don't particularly care about finding a better solution to Austin's traffic than trying to make them Katy 2.0.
    Keeping/expanding the Dillo would have been perfect for city center movement.

  14. #39
    Enemy of the System Millennial_Messiah's Avatar
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    Austin will likely never be dense enough for subways. But they need to focus on regional rail systems to make it feasible to get into downtown without having to drive or take a slow bus. Instead, they're focusing on a new line that goes between 38th and SoCo and that doesn't even get out to the airport. It seems designed to benefit the rich folks already living in the center, who are the the ones currently suffering the most from the traffic. I bet it's way more expensive to build per mile than the regional rail system is, and they don't even seem to be planning for folks who want to try this ty rail system driving in from the outskirts to the termini of the line to try to use it for the last bit of the journey.

    Then in terms of roads TXDOT is expanding 35 in a way that seems like it could be a nightmare. Austin badly needs to create a way for through-traffic to bypass the main highway. In the south they're building an upper deck, but downtown they're planning on eminent domaining some historical land to widen 35 to 20 lanes. I think the concept of "induced demand" is poorly understood by folks critical of car culture, but unless these extra lanes are extremely well designed, it's going to be a cluster .

    So yeah, the path to fixing Austin's traffic is pretty clear: 1) Build a loop around the city for through-traffic to use as a bypass. 2) Build a rail network to bring people in the extremities of the city and the surrounding suburbs into the city center. 3) Create a compact trolley/bus/streetcar system for people to travel around the city center. Yes, increasing density needs to happen. But that's something that's going to require more than a magic wand. In that same way, continuing to normalize telework wherever possible would alleviate some pressure. But for me the main issue is that despite being the lowest in priority, the city is focusing on moving about the city city center and scrapping the more straight-forward options in an effort to continue to court rich people looking to move, tourists and celebrities rather than trying to make life better and more affordable for the folks who are already here. The thing they can't control is that the state government is obsessed with trying to maintain the car/fossil fuel culture wiser planners are trying to get away from, and they continue to frustrate many more progressive measures the city tries to take. They are the ones who decide which highways go where, and they don't particularly care about finding a better solution to Austin's traffic than trying to make them Katy 2.0.
    The problem with the "bypass" idea is that they already spent billions on that stupid toll road which is way to and gone but still serves as a "bypass" to some extent. And, it's expensive. But TxDot doesn't care about the average bear. Either spend out the butt on gas, time, and toll fares, or pull your hair out averaging 3 mph on I-35. Your choice.

  15. #40
    my unders, my frgn whites pgardn's Avatar
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    The density of heavy transport vehicles is ungodly on 35 as well.
    Could use more than 1 lane to keep them out.
    Unfortunately too much of 35 is essentially 3 lanes

    remarkably in my experience the truckers stay out of the far left lane like they are supposed to

  16. #41
    Alleged Michigander ChumpDumper's Avatar
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    The density of heavy transport vehicles is ungodly on 35 as well.
    Could use more than 1 lane to keep them out.
    Unfortunately too much of 35 is essentially 3 lanes

    remarkably in my experience the truckers stay out of the far left lane like they are supposed to
    It's actually illegal for them to be in the left lane from like Ben White to Georgetown. At least it was.

    They should really incentivize thru truckers to use 130. , make it free for them.

  17. #42
    Saytowns Fawtbox King lebomb's Avatar
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    There needs to be a way to get to 130 Toll Rd around New Braunfels or San Marcos area. Waiting to Buda to get to 130 is way to late, and who wants to drive 60mi. out of the way past Seguin to get to 130 from San Antonio.

  18. #43
    Kang Trill Clinton's Avatar
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    It's not great, tbh. Massive influx of people for years without any planning or infrastructure to support it.
    Sounds like SA.

  19. #44
    Veteran Xevious's Avatar
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    Austin will likely never be dense enough for subways. But they need to focus on regional rail systems to make it feasible to get into downtown without having to drive or take a slow bus. Instead, they're focusing on a new line that goes between 38th and SoCo and that doesn't even get out to the airport. It seems designed to benefit the rich folks already living in the center, who are the the ones currently suffering the least from the traffic (and contributing the most to the housing crisis). I bet it's way more expensive to build per mile than the regional rail system is, and they don't even seem to be planning for folks who want to try this ty rail system driving in from the outskirts to the termini of the line to try to use it for the last bit of the journey.

    Then in terms of roads TXDOT is expanding 35 in a way that seems like it could be a nightmare. Austin badly needs to create a way for through-traffic to bypass the main highway. In the south they're building an upper deck, but downtown they're planning on eminent domaining some historical land to widen 35 to 20 lanes. I think the concept of "induced demand" is poorly understood by folks critical of car culture, but unless these extra lanes are extremely well designed, it's going to be a cluster .

    So yeah, the path to fixing Austin's traffic is pretty clear: 1) Build a loop around the city for through-traffic to use as a bypass. 2) Build a rail network to bring people in the extremities of the city and the surrounding suburbs into the city center. 3) Create a compact trolley/bus/streetcar system for people to travel around the city center. Yes, increasing density needs to happen. But that's something that's going to require more than a magic wand. In that same way, continuing to normalize telework wherever possible would alleviate some pressure. But for me the main issue is that despite being the lowest in priority, the city is focusing on moving about the city city center and scrapping the more straight-forward options in an effort to continue to court rich people looking to move, tourists and celebrities rather than trying to make life better and more affordable for the folks who are already here. The thing they can't control is that the state government is obsessed with trying to maintain the car/fossil fuel culture wiser planners are trying to get away from, and they continue to frustrate many more progressive measures the city tries to take. They are the ones who decide which highways go where, and they don't particularly care about finding a better solution to Austin's traffic than trying to make them Katy 2.0.
    Austin has needed a loop for ing decades.

  20. #45
    Veteran GAustex's Avatar
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    Terrain in west Austin is a problem

  21. #46
    Alleged Michigander ChumpDumper's Avatar
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    Terrain in west Austin is a problem
    It's pretty much built out unless they go super dense (ha) and Cedar Park/Lakeway don't want 620 to be made into a freeway to protect their businesses along it. The loop will never really loop.

    East towards Manor is the next big growth corridor, especially when/if the landfills along 290 close.

  22. #47
    I cannot grok its fullnes leemajors's Avatar
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    It's pretty much built out unless they go super dense (ha) and Cedar Park/Lakeway don't want 620 to be made into a freeway to protect their businesses along it. The loop will never really loop.

    East towards Manor is the next big growth corridor, especially when/if the landfills along 290 close.
    The 290 toll road ending right into those damn stoplights is the worst.

  23. #48
    Enemy of the System Millennial_Messiah's Avatar
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    SA has a good highway system. The inner city roads are ty and full of potholes, but the mother roads are good for the most part. I-35, I-10, Loop I-410, and Loop TX-1604. Also, I-37 in the southeast.

    Austin doesn't even come close to having it that good.

  24. #49
    Damns (Given): 0 Blake's Avatar
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    Mostly on the far north/northwest side of town where new communities are being built by the minute, especially around the Braun/1604 area heading west around the loop. The state has done a lot of work on it though of late.

    Getting around town even during rush hour really is not that bad at all compared to the other big Texas cities. Bonus: no toll roads.

  25. #50
    Veteran GAustex's Avatar
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    It's pretty much built out unless they go super dense (ha) and Cedar Park/Lakeway don't want 620 to be made into a freeway to protect their businesses along it. The loop will never really loop.

    East towards Manor is the next big growth corridor, especially when/if the landfills along 290 close.
    Getting to freeway criteria would be a challenge as the existing corridor is not close to meeting high speed criteria.

    Horizontal and vertical challenges exist. Extensive reconstruction through Lakeway would be frowned upon

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